Letter: No reason to stress over your undergraduate degree

Finals week brings with it the taste of blood in the air: hundreds of students pushing themselves to insane physical and mental limits to try to improve or maintain their averages, and stay in their program. Popular remedies include ingesting coffee and energy drinks, and spending entire days at a time pouring over every bit of information from the whole semester. This is an insane amount of effort and stress put into something that in the long run is as inconsequential to you, the individual reader, as your favourite subject was in high school. The reason most people put so much effort into their studies at the undergrad level is to either buff up their hiring prospects or get into […]

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Opinion: University degrees are just the first step in finding a job

A recent article published by the CBC explores the idea that post-secondary graduates are no longer guaranteed stable employment with their education. According to the article, more than a quarter of Canadians between the ages of 15 and 24 are underemployed, meaning they have degrees but the positions they are employed in don’t require them. Of course, it is information like this that scares many of us so close to graduation. While I don’t think a university degree is completely useless, I strongly believe it is not an absolute guarantee for employment—nor should we expect it to be. The article quotes Kimberly Ellis-Hale, an instructor at Wilfrid Laurier University, who states, “With a good education, you will have a good […]

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Editorial: Cuts to service centre hours hurt students

Students working as service centre co-ordinators for the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) will see their hours cut in half over the summer, from 20 hours a week to 10 per co-ordinator. Cutting these hours is a bad idea, as it reduces the amount of time service centre co-ordinators have over the summer to familiarize themselves with the position. Although demand for service centres is certainly lower in the summer, as there are fewer students on campus, reducing their opening hours will be detrimental to those students who do still need access to these centres. Having a service centre open for just 20 hours a week greatly limits when students will be able to access services. If the hours are […]

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Letter: Contract instructing hurts students and professors alike

With so many contract instructors teaching our classes, students are being taught by working professionals, rather than by professors whose full-time job is to focus on students. This is having a negative effect on both the quality of the education we receive, and the perception of the value that our degrees hold. Students are paying for a high-quality education, but instead they are receiving lectures that are read out of a textbook by contract instructors, who generally don’t get much training or practical experience in even the most basic aspects of teaching—such as creating questions. This is an issue for a few reasons, but mainly because it is changing the way universities are perceived and contributes to students having to […]

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Editorial: University rankings can’t be taken seriously

Ottawa was voted in by students as the best city to study, in a new ranking category as part of QS World University Rankings’ annual list of the top 10 cities to study in the world. It’s important to remember rankings like this aren’t necessarily reflective of what most students think. Around 18,000 students took part in the voting process, ranking the top cities based on factors such as affordability, employment opportunities, diversity, tolerance and inclusion, and ease of getting around. While Ottawa was apparently the clear winner, beating out cities such as Montreal, Boston, and Shanghai, a number of students will probably disagree with Ottawa’s place on the list due to their experience living in the city for many […]

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