Senate amends student transcript policy

A recent policy change from Carleton’s Senate alters the way dropped courses are marked on student transcripts. Students who drop courses after Sept. 30, the last official day to withdraw from a course with a fee readjustment, will have the dropped course marked as “WDN,” or “withdrawn,” on both official and unofficial Carleton University transcripts. A transcript is a copy of a student’s permanent academic record, listing all courses taken and grades earned. Carleton students are able to request a copy of their official and unofficial transcript through Carleton Central. Prior to this policy change, students could drop courses until the last official day of classes without receiving a notation on their transcript. The reason for the change, according to […]

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New architecture project is the bee’s knees

Canada’s temporary Senate building is gearing up to become a hive of activity, thanks in part to Carleton architecture students. Senators moving into the Government Conference Centre during renovations to the Centre Block on Parliament Hill will be sharing the space with a colony of honeybees. The initiative to install urban beehives on the roof is a partnership between Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC), Fairmont Château Laurier, and Carleton. Although the project is in its early stages, the intention is to use urban beehive designs from students at Carleton’s Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism. In November 2016, Senator Terry Mercer, deputy chair of the Senate Committee on Agriculture and Forestry, submitted letters to the Speakers of the House […]

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CASG proposes course outline policy change

Carleton’s Academic Student Government (CASG) is putting forth a proposal to Carleton’s Senate that would require professors to post course outlines a week before classes begin. The current policy allows professors to distribute the syllabi the day before the class begins. Justin Bergamini, CASG’s vice-president (operations), said he wants to ensure that students are not overwhelmed at the beginning of a semester. “Getting these course outlines available a week in advance would allow students to prepare themselves more for their year . . . a little bit of preparation at the beginning of the year can go a long way,” he said. Bergamini added students could explore more cost-friendly textbook options and better prepare for the semester ahead if the […]

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Letter: Trump won’t last for long

With Donald Trump’s inauguration coming up in January alongside a Republican-controlled House of Representatives and Senate, and a handful of potential Supreme Court vacancies on the horizon, it would appear that the United States may be making a hard-right turn for a generation. However, history doesn’t necessarily share this interpretation. Trump does not have a mandate to govern the U.S. He lost the popular vote, and many of the states that gave him his victory had small enough margins that it could easily be reversed in upcoming years. The Democratic Party is poised to make a dramatic comeback if it plays its cards right. First, we must consider the main factor that got Trump elected: anger. Americans, especially those living […]

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Medical schools consider curricula changes with assisted dying law

Now that medical assisted dying is legal in Canada, Geneviève Moineau, president and CEO of the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, said information about assisted dying will need to be incorporated into the curricula across Canada’s 17 medical schools. “It is important that every medical student understand the legislation, understand what is expected of them by law, what their rights are,” Moineau said. “It is important that the curriculum for all of our medical schools in Canada be up-to-date and include information on new laws as they come about.” Bill C-14, also known as the Medical Assistance in Dying bill (MAD), was assented  by the Senate on June 17. The legislation carves out an exception in the Criminal […]

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