CASG proposes course outline policy change

Carleton’s Academic Student Government (CASG) is putting forth a proposal to Carleton’s Senate that would require professors to post course outlines a week before classes begin. The current policy allows professors to distribute the syllabi the day before the class begins. Justin Bergamini, CASG’s vice-president (operations), said he wants to ensure that students are not overwhelmed at the beginning of a semester. “Getting these course outlines available a week in advance would allow students to prepare themselves more for their year . . . a little bit of preparation at the beginning of the year can go a long way,” he said. Bergamini added students could explore more cost-friendly textbook options and better prepare for the semester ahead if the […]

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Letter: Trump won’t last for long

With Donald Trump’s inauguration coming up in January alongside a Republican-controlled House of Representatives and Senate, and a handful of potential Supreme Court vacancies on the horizon, it would appear that the United States may be making a hard-right turn for a generation. However, history doesn’t necessarily share this interpretation. Trump does not have a mandate to govern the U.S. He lost the popular vote, and many of the states that gave him his victory had small enough margins that it could easily be reversed in upcoming years. The Democratic Party is poised to make a dramatic comeback if it plays its cards right. First, we must consider the main factor that got Trump elected: anger. Americans, especially those living […]

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Medical schools consider curricula changes with assisted dying law

Now that medical assisted dying is legal in Canada, Geneviève Moineau, president and CEO of the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada, said information about assisted dying will need to be incorporated into the curricula across Canada’s 17 medical schools. “It is important that every medical student understand the legislation, understand what is expected of them by law, what their rights are,” Moineau said. “It is important that the curriculum for all of our medical schools in Canada be up-to-date and include information on new laws as they come about.” Bill C-14, also known as the Medical Assistance in Dying bill (MAD), was assented  by the Senate on June 17. The legislation carves out an exception in the Criminal […]

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Letter: Changing O Canada lyrics won’t promote equality

“O Canada! Our home and native land! True patriot love, in all thy sons command.” Canadians from far and wide know these lyrics, having belted them out with our countrymen thousands of times. To proud citizens, “O Canada” is a source of national pride, true identity, and most obviously, a source of blatant sexism. Wait – what!? According to the 225 supporters of Bill C-210 within the House of Commons, this is the case. Proposed by MP Mauril Bélanger in May, Bill C-210 would change the lyrics “in all thy sons command” to “in all of us command.” The bill has made it through three readings and discussions and will soon enter the Senate. Canadians could potentially have a “new” […]

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Lower enrolment could mean smaller CUSA budget

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) could have its budget reduced in the future if the number of students enrolling at Carleton drops, according to a report at the university’s Senate meeting. CUSA president Fahd Alhattab presented the Senate’s findings to CUSA council at its Feb. 29 meeting. “The presentation by Duncan Watt, vice-president (finance) for the university, regarding the financial situation of the university is quite interesting and quite concerning for the health of the student union in the future,” he told other councillors. He said Carleton will see a downward trend of student recruitment in line with population changes in Ontario. “There are just less 18-year-olds in Ontario. Less 18-year-olds means less students at Carleton, less students at […]

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