Letter: Smoke-free campuses will help end smoking addiction

Full disclosure, I am a smoker. I started before my 16th birthday about four years ago. Now, I hear that the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) is joining a few other schools in going smoke-free. That means no cigarettes, electronic cigarettes, water pipes, cigars, or tobacco anywhere on campus. As a smoker, I heard this and scoffed. But deep down, I think this is a good idea. Some students may say that smoking is their stress-relief. Even I say this. But it is not fact. More accurately, lighting up a cigarette has been shown to increase anxiety and tension. While students like myself might feel immediate release when the smoke hits their lips, they are not doing themselves any […]

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Health and Fitness Blog: Fight off the Freshman 15

Everyone at one point in time entering university has probably heard of the infamous “freshman 15,” the so-called 15 pounds first-year students often gain. So how can you—a bright-eyed, bushy-tailed freshman—avoid said 15 pounds? How can you stay healthy throughout the entire school year? It’s actually pretty simple. Eat a well-rounded diet and exercise. Before we get to the tips, let’s address a few things. Being healthy is 80 per cent diet and 20 per cent exercise, so believe it or not, but consuming your weight in alcohol and following that with a basket of chicken wings will not be balanced out by a bottle of water and 30 minutes of running the next day. Lastly, slimness isn’t the same […]

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Opinion: First-generation students can succeed

I was always a good student, but also struggled. Cloaked under good grades that assured my distant parents that all was well were feelings of alienation, helplessness and even shame. My first year was the hardest. In high school, I spoke up in class, but in a university lecture hall or discussion group, I was mum. I soon fell into common routines–residence, class, cafeteria. University’s supposed to be about broadening your horizons, right? It often felt like an overwhelming power was pressed on me. It was the institution and the privilege it symbolized. It was the school’s unfamiliarity. It was other students who did worse in school but seemed to belong here more than I did. It was felt in […]

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Cape Breton University offers free online courses

Last fall, Cape Breton University (CBU) introduced free online courses, and the response has been better than expected, according to the Cape Breton Post. The program’s director, Laura Baker, in an interview with the Cape Breton Post, said they were expecting few registrants, but soon had more than a thousand students enrolled. Students can register in the courses for three purposes: to receive a certificate of participation, a credit, or simply out of curiosity. The credit option is exclusive to Cape Breton students, where the courses can count as credits toward their degrees. For $75, students can receive a certificate of participation stating they have completed the course, while those looking to simply learn something new can take part for free at any time. The courses […]

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Editorial: Contrary to student budgets, arts degrees have value

If you’re majoring in the arts, you’ve probably heard the word “unemployment” before. Despite what people might assume about BA undergrads, you’ll find them in every company, big and small. Although the unemployment rate for arts majors is slightly higher than those in the sciences, arts degrees are far from useless, and universities should stop labelling them as such. Arts majors rule the industries of social science, education, and government service, constituting a huge portion of the job force. Arts degrees provide invaluable research, writing, and persuasion skills that are vital for all careers, whether it comes to writing a lab report, or a press release. Increased budget cuts for undergraduates in the arts will only perpetuate the stigma that […]

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