Drug facilitated sexual assault: what you should know before Frosh 2017

If you have ever hesitated before taking a sip of the drink you left with a friend at a bar, you are not alone. Drug facilitated sexual assault (DFSA) happens more than you think, and it’s four times more likely to occur to someone while they’re completing their post-secondary education, according to Carleton University’s Equity Services webpage. Carole Miller, a crisis counsellor for the Ottawa Police Service, has spoken with many people who have experienced sexual assault, but said it happens more often in universities where experimentation with alcohol and sexuality is already happening. “It’s a tough subject, and normal rites of passage, normal, healthy experimentation is happening anyways,” she said. According to the Equity Services department webpage, “[DFSA is] […]

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Carleton president delivers state of the university speech

Carleton president Roseann Runte gave her annual State of the University address on Sept. 9 in the Tory Building. The speech touched on a variety of topics, including construction on campus, student enrolment, and Carleton’s developing sexual assault policy. “Over the summer, much work has been done on the seven-storey Health Science Building,” Runte said. Set to house the health science and neuroscience programs, the Academic Health Science Building will include a 350-seat lecture theatre, wet labs, and research space. According to Runte, the building is scheduled to be ready for classes in the fall of 2017. Runte also thanked faculty and staff for their “brilliant” recruitment efforts, which she credited for Carleton’s “fantastic” one per cent increase in full-time […]

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Today’s cup of tea: Sexual consent

From a young age, children are taught to understand that “no means no” – no to that chocolate bar they desperately want, no to jumping on the couch, no to staying up late past their bedtimes. But what happens when someone doesn’t say no or is incapable of saying no? Does that mean yes? It is essential to understand how “no means no” applies when it comes to sex, to know when you have obtained consent, and most importantly, when you have not obtained consent.   When someone says no, it means that he or she is not consenting. But what if the person consented and then lost consciousness? Or what if the person initially said yes but then changed […]

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