Part-time jobs push students to the limit

With tuition, housing costs, and food to consider, many Canadian college and university students must complete their undergrad alongside a part-time job. According to a Statistics Canada report from 2010, the percentage of students working a part-time job during their post-secondary education has increased over the last 35 years from one in four, to one in two. This is due in part to the increasing inflation of tuition fees since the 1990s. Alongside this increase of student employment, René Morissette, the assistant director and research director of Statistics Canada, said job quality for youth has deteriorated over the last four decades. However, youth tend to find employment faster than their adult counterparts because of their willingness to take a variety […]

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The portrayal of physical disability in entertainment media

According to Statistics Canada, about 15 per cent of the world’s population is affected by a disability, and over 3.8 million people in Canada live with a disability.  Yet, we rarely see characters with disabilities on TV. Beyond that, we see even fewer actors with disabilities. RJ Mitte, who plays Walter Jr. on the hit tv show Breaking Bad is an example of the small percentage of actors with a disability. Mitte, like Walter Jr., has cerebral palsy. He was diagnosed at the age of three. In regards to characters with disabilities being played by actors without the disability, Mitte said, “If you look at it on an accurate level and if you want to portray real characters, they have […]

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Tuition is increasing faster than inflation and wages, says report

A new report estimates Canadian undergraduate tuition fees will rise almost 18 per cent over the next four years, adding fuel to the debate over whether higher education is worth shelling out for. The recently-released study by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) says tuition is continuing to increase at a faster pace than the rate of inflation — a trend that has continued for more than two decades. The projected increase doesn’t bode well for lower income families. Statistics Canada says almost a third of 18 to 24-year-olds cite finances as the primary reason they don’t pursue education after high school. An additional 4.8 per cent said they weren’t able to get a loan. Ontario and Nova Scotia […]

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