Letter: Clean meat-a friendly future for food

Recent breakthroughs in science have allowed for meat to be grown and harvested without an animal, thus allowing for the consumption of meat without the requisite slaughter of animals. This modern breakthrough is called ‘clean meat.’ Clean meat involves the growth of stem cells in an external medium, or bioreactor. The stem cells differentiate and can produce a variety of meats. Clean meat is identical to traditionally-sourced meat, which is primarily composed of 75 per cent water, 20 per cent protein, and five per cent fat. Last year, 56 billion animals were slaughtered for human consumption. In North America and most of the developed world, several animals are primarily used for meat: chicken, cattle, pigs, turkey, duck, lamb, and fish. […]

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Opinion: Get involved with research labs

If you’re an incoming undergraduate science student, this is the post for you. I’m a fourth-year student in the biochemistry and biotechnology combined honours program who has worked in a systems biology lab on campus since the early days of his degree, and I have some useful tips. In 2015, I was very lucky to receive a Dean’s Summer Research Internship from the Faculty of Science. Since then I’ve been returning to the same lab each summer thanks to funding from Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and my supervisor. Thus, alongside my formal schooling during the fall and winter terms, I’ve received a hidden education — one you won’t experience unless you work in a lab (or in the field). In […]

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Questions answered: What to know about the new Health Science Building

Unless you’re a long-distance student, or have an extremely poor attendance record, you’ve undoubtedly noticed the hulking mass of construction which has loomed over the Steacie Building for the past year and a half. If either of the aforementioned categories do apply to you: meet the Health Science Building. The Charlatan reviewed university documents about the building and talked to Darryl Boyce, Carleton vice-president (facilities management and planning), to answer some questions about the new building. Here are seven things to know about what’s happened so far, what has yet to be done, and what Carleton has planned for the new building going forward. What’s it for, and what will go into it when it’s done? The building is intended […]

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Carleton prof receives $5.5 million in funding for climate change research

Catherine McKenna, minister of climate change and the environment, and Kristy Duncan, minister of science, announced on Oct. 19 the federal government’s commitment of $22 million towards climate change research at an event held at Carleton. Carleton professor Matthew Johnson and his team of researchers were one of the four recipients, and received $5.5 million in funding for research on flaring. Flaring is the burning of natural gas that cannot be processed, Johnson said, and its effects on the environment include black carbon emissions, and accelerated melting of snow. Duncan said the money will fund four networks across the country—projects focused on the environment, natural resources, advanced manufacturing, and energy. “[Johnson] and his team will work to better understand the impact of […]

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GLAMGames encourages women in STEM

The organization 1125@Carleton is sparking the interest of women who are passionate about math and game development with their upcoming women-only event to promote women in the gaming industry. The event, titled GLAMGames 2016, will take place from May 27-29 at Carleton, and is part of a challenge hosted by the European Network of Living Labs (ENoLL) to design games that educate players about mathematics. The event was founded by JamToday, according to Lois Frankel, the academic director of 1125@Carleton. Participants, who must be over 18 years old, will be split up into teams and will have until 3 p.m. on May 29 to make their math-oriented gaming concepts come to life. “We intend to have the games highlighted on the […]

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