Letter: Religious perspectives can interfere with knowledge

Religion—Karl Marx’s “opiate of the masses”—and a thing in which people still somehow believe in. As most of us know, Carleton University was founded on secular principles, but does that mean religion cannot be a part of the school foundation or modern curriculum? Yes, that’s exactly what it means! Religion should have no influence on what is studied, except for religion because it is a piece of human history. Negative and positive aspects of human nature rely on the understanding of religious doctrine and dogma. Being a heavily-lapsed Catholic—basically an agnostic—I see religion in a negative light. However, I do have some form of respect for those who still somehow keep their beliefs and moral principles from declining platforms of […]

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Science Blog: Tube-ular cell research

As I labeled my 180th microcentrifuge tube of the morning, I wondered what the scene looked like to anyone passing by. It might have resembled another one of those images of a person in a lab coat surrounded by unfamiliar lab equipment doing some sort of tedious task. I’d like to tell you the story of my own experience in research in my three years in science at Carleton to hopefully flesh out this picture a bit more. Over the past three years, I have learned a great deal about the fascinating biological processes that govern our lives. Two summer research grants have given me an opportunity to extend my knowledge beyond the classroom in an immunology lab. Immunology is […]

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Science Blog: Open the black box

As a third-year student in science, I often think back to what it means to be a scientist. The definition that I like to live by, is that a scientist is someone who gives a voice to the material world, in analyzing and explaining the phenomena that both surround us and comprise us. If we truly consider these words to define us in science, then I believe that we as scientists are not projecting our voices very well. The analogy of the “black box” is often used in science and technology to describe a system or object that can be understood in terms of what goes in and comes out.  There is no actual knowledge pertaining to what is inside […]

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Letter: Science should engage, rather than alienate

Governor General Julie Payette recently delivered a speech at the ninth annual Canadian Science Policy Conference in Ottawa, in which she attempted to shed light on the overwhelming lack of acceptance of science in the general public. In this speech, she joked about a wide range of issues, from the refusal to acknowledge human contribution to climate change, to the belief in horoscopes. As a science student watching what is unfolding in the White House, I am absolutely on the same page as Payette in terms of her disbelief at the lack of acceptance of many theories in science that are supported by overwhelming evidence. However, while I admire her passion for uniform understanding and acceptance of science, I do […]

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Letter: Clean meat-a friendly future for food

Recent breakthroughs in science have allowed for meat to be grown and harvested without an animal, thus allowing for the consumption of meat without the requisite slaughter of animals. This modern breakthrough is called ‘clean meat.’ Clean meat involves the growth of stem cells in an external medium, or bioreactor. The stem cells differentiate and can produce a variety of meats. Clean meat is identical to traditionally-sourced meat, which is primarily composed of 75 per cent water, 20 per cent protein, and five per cent fat. Last year, 56 billion animals were slaughtered for human consumption. In North America and most of the developed world, several animals are primarily used for meat: chicken, cattle, pigs, turkey, duck, lamb, and fish. […]

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