Editorial: Take the time to learn about managing finances

Carleton students need to take advantage of the financial information the university offers to minimize the effect of struggling financially in school and the amount of student debt they graduate with. From government-funded programs like OSAP, to GoFundMe campaigns, to working near full-time hours while in school, students are looking to various methods to afford high tuition and other school-related costs. However, this is just one step in paying for university. University students needs to know what to do with the money they have, and how to budget to afford university and graduate with as little debt as possible. This starts with taking advantage of the resources available to them at university. For example, throughout the month of November, the […]

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Letter: Reduced course loads should mean lower tuition

Everyone knows tuition fees are expensive and everyone complains, but this isn’t your typical ‘tuition fees are too high’ argument. Students who opt to take four credits each year actually end up paying even more to complete their degree. If you break it down, a typical undergraduate degree has students fulfill 20 credits, and to graduate in four years—a pressure most students are faced with—they must take at least five credits each year of study. But what if you can’t handle the stress of a full course load? Or you have a demanding part-time job? Or you have some sort of disability that prevents you from successfully completing a five-credit course load? Well, surprise! You’ll be paying more in tuition […]

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Survey finds students confused about current OSAP system

A survey of post-secondary students regarding the perception and knowledge of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) found that about a third of students are confused about how OSAP works. The survey found many students didn’t know about the repayment plan for OSAP or thought it didn’t apply to them. Students were also confused about how long the repayment grace period is for OSAP after graduation, which is six months. Cassandra Cao, a senior researcher at the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) think tank, conducted the story as part of the organization’s “ongoing research on student financial barriers” in post-secondary education. “This study was specifically designed to support work we are doing on evaluating the imminent reforms to […]

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A new OSAP system is coming this September. Here’s how it will work:

When Carleton’s 2017 fall semester starts in September, students will see the potential benefits of an overhauled Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) system. The upcoming school year will see the introduction of a new Ontario Student Grant (OSG), a program the provincial Liberal government hopes will make post-secondary education more affordable. On March 29, the government announced that it would start accepting applications for the new OSAP program. But how will students actually be affected?  Free tuition? Not quite yet The most talked about change aims to make post-secondary education more affordable for low-income students. Universities are worried about declining enrolment and hope that lower fees will encourage students to consider post-secondary education. Under the grant, students whose annual family income is under $50,000 will have average tuition covered by the […]

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New Brunswick adds tuition relief for middle-class

The New Brunswick provincial government is following in other provinces’ footsteps by increasing tuition relief for middle-class students for the 2017-18 school year. The new Tuition Relief for the Middle Class (TRMC) program, available to New Brunswick full-time students enrolled in a university or college on or after Aug. 1, will further subsidize the cost of higher education in middle-class families. The TRMC surpasses the coverage provided by the Tuition Access Bursary (TAB)—a similar tuition relief initiative for the 2016-17 school year—that offered financial assistance to college and university students whose families earned $60,000 or less per year. The New Brunswick government confirmed the TAB fell short of its target to help approximately 7,100 students—23 per cent of the student […]

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