Survey finds students confused about current OSAP system

A survey of post-secondary students regarding the perception and knowledge of the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) found that about a third of students are confused about how OSAP works. The survey found many students didn’t know about the repayment plan for OSAP or thought it didn’t apply to them. Students were also confused about how long the repayment grace period is for OSAP after graduation, which is six months. Cassandra Cao, a senior researcher at the Higher Education Quality Council of Ontario (HEQCO) think tank, conducted the story as part of the organization’s “ongoing research on student financial barriers” in post-secondary education. “This study was specifically designed to support work we are doing on evaluating the imminent reforms to […]

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A new OSAP system is coming this September. Here’s how it will work:

When Carleton’s 2017 fall semester starts in September, students will see the potential benefits of an overhauled Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) system. The upcoming school year will see the introduction of a new Ontario Student Grant (OSG), a program the provincial Liberal government hopes will make post-secondary education more affordable. On March 29, the government announced that it would start accepting applications for the new OSAP program. But how will students actually be affected?  Free tuition? Not quite yet The most talked about change aims to make post-secondary education more affordable for low-income students. Universities are worried about declining enrolment and hope that lower fees will encourage students to consider post-secondary education. Under the grant, students whose annual family income is under $50,000 will have average tuition covered by the […]

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New Brunswick adds tuition relief for middle-class

The New Brunswick provincial government is following in other provinces’ footsteps by increasing tuition relief for middle-class students for the 2017-18 school year. The new Tuition Relief for the Middle Class (TRMC) program, available to New Brunswick full-time students enrolled in a university or college on or after Aug. 1, will further subsidize the cost of higher education in middle-class families. The TRMC surpasses the coverage provided by the Tuition Access Bursary (TAB)—a similar tuition relief initiative for the 2016-17 school year—that offered financial assistance to college and university students whose families earned $60,000 or less per year. The New Brunswick government confirmed the TAB fell short of its target to help approximately 7,100 students—23 per cent of the student […]

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Learning beyond borders: Is studying abroad a worthwhile experience? How can it be affordable?

Getting out of Ottawa to learn in another country is an appealing opportunity for many students. Countless exchange programs exist at Carleton University and beyond, enticing students to explore the world outside of their classrooms. Carleton’s International Student Services Office (ISSO) website states that Carleton annually partners with 170 institutions in over 30 countries to provide both incoming and outgoing students with the opportunity to study abroad. But is studying abroad a worthwhile experience? And can it be affordable for the average student? International opportunities aside from exchange Chau Hoang, the exchange partnership administrator with the ISSO, said some degree programs at Carleton have an exchange requirement. This includes students enrolled in international business and global and international studies. But […]

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Declining college enrolment could lead to more costly tuition

Changes to Ontario’s student loan program can’t come soon enough for the province’s colleges. Falling enrolment at post-secondary institutions has been particularly disastrous for colleges. Without action, it could potentially send schools into nearly $2 billion of debt in eight years, according to a recent report from PricewaterhouseCoopers, an advisory firm. “The government has been only funding colleges for enrolment growth,” said Linda Franklin, president and CEO of Colleges Ontario. “What that means is if your school’s enrolment goes down two per cent, you get less money from the government.” Franklin said an aging population likely means that enrolment will keep falling. “We’ve just hit a period in time where the echo boom has just gone through post-secondary [education],” Franklin […]

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