Algonquin’s student paper goes rogue during faculty strike

With the Ontario college strike proceeding into its fifth week, Algonquin College journalism students are taking campus media coverage into their own hands. The Algonquin Times is built into the curriculum of the journalism program at Algonquin, where second-year students submit stories for publication in return for a grade. The paper reports on campus issues and is published every three weeks. However, several days before the strike, journalism classes were told by the Algonquin College Students’ Association to cease production out of respect for the faculty. Devyn Barrie, a second-year journalism student at Algonquin and the campus government editor of the paper, said he and a small group of students decided to go rogue and continue publishing under the name […]

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Editorial: PTSD-affected journalists need better support

It’s an understatement to say that journalism is a difficult career. While local journalists struggle to adapt to shrinking newsrooms, their counterparts reporting from unstable regions are often put into physically dangerous situations. Going from a safe, war-free country like Canada to somewhere like Burma right now, where hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims are facing military violence and fleeing their homes, poses a serious threat to journalists’ mental and physical well-being. Many journalists return from conflict zones suffering and scarred, without the proper outlets to recover. Some even develop post-traumatic stress disorder or other mental illnesses as a result of witnessing and experiencing trauma. The support they receive from their employers upon return is simply not adequate. Journalists who […]

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Rosemary Barton talks the future of journalism

Rosemary Barton talked about her hopes for the future of journalism as the speaker for Carleton’s Dick, Ruth and Judy Bell Lecture, held on March 28. A graduate of Carleton’s masters of journalism program, Barton is the current host of CBC’s Power & Politics television show. The lecture is an annual event to honour people who have made contributions to political and public life in Canada, according to opening remarks made by Faculty of Public Affairs (FPA) dean André Plourde. The event was held as part of FPA Research Month. “To have time to reflect on what I do and why it matters is a great thing,” Barton said at the beginning of her speech, titled “Why Journalism Matters (now […]

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Carleton hosts Peter Mansbridge for 2017 Kesterton Lecture

Peter Mansbridge spoke in front of a packed crowd of nearly 300 attendees as he delivered the 18th annual Kesterton lecture at Carleton on March 21. Mansbridge’s lecture focused on the challenges journalists face in an industry that is always changing, now more rapidly than ever, he said. The event, which was part of the Faculty of Public Affairs’ Research Month, is named in honour of Wilfred H. Kesterton, one of the founders of the School of Journalism and Communication. Mansbridge, the long-time host of CBC’s The National, will be retiring on July 1 this year. He suggested that his “face” of The National could well be replaced by the “faces” of multiple anchors, and has encouraged the CBC to […]

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Opinion: Engagement defeats “fake news”

The rise of the internet was supposed to be the dawn of a new era, with access to information that previous generations could only dream about. It was meant to bring people together from across the world and to foster educated and thoughtful debates. Unfortunately, the idealistic vision I just described couldn’t be farther from today’s reality. Far too often in an increasingly polarized society, people are ignoring the vast resources at their disposal and are instead cherry-picking questionable evidence to back up their claims. The abandonment of fact-based research is making it extremely difficult for people to grasp the complexities of issues, or acknowledge that another side to an argument might exist. Many are intent on decrying the rise […]

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