Ottawa celebrates Canada 150 amidst rain and large crowds

Amidst heavy rain, long line-ups, and other controversial moments, Canadians from coast to coast gathered at Parliament Hill on Canada Day to celebrate Canada 150, witnessing a day’s worth of musical performances, special guest appearances, and nighttime fireworks. Throughout the early morning, the main focus was on Indigenous issues, following the setup of a teepee on Parliament Hill on June 28 by a group of Indigenous activists. Calling it a “re-occupation,” the intent was to highlight Canada’s history of violence and forced assimilation towards Indigenous people, according to the Toronto Star.  “[Canada Day allows us] to reflect on our past, to cheer on today, and to recommit ourselves to the future,” Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said in his morning speech. “This is […]

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Satirical art thriving under U.S. administration

When Michael de Adder received news of U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, he said he felt shock and anger, and decided to pick up his pens and draw a picture of Trump kissing a reluctant Lady Liberty. A Halifax-based, award-winning editorial cartoonist, de Adder is one cartoonist among many who has found plenty to draw about during this new American presidential term. “If everything was hunky-dory in the world, cartoonists would have a hard go of it,” de Adder said. “But politics, being what it is, always leads to situations that are ripe for lampooning. And right now, the situation couldn’t be better for cartoonists.” For de Adder, what motivates him to draw political cartoons is anger. He said his […]

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Most universities don’t collect data on student race, including Carleton

Many Canadian universities have little to no substantial data on how their students identify racially, according to a recent CBC investigation. Over the past five months, CBC asked 76 Canadian universities to provide racial information about their student population, and more than 60 universities—including Carleton University—said they don’t collect that data. Jeremy McDonald, the executive producer of the CBC report, said in an email the investigation was prompted by a recent increase in discussions about race and discrimination on campuses, and the information was gathered during CBC investigations on sexual assaults at universities. “In what is supposed to be an enlightened environment, racialized students say they are dealing with challenges that can have implications for their academic performance and overall […]

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Rosemary Barton talks the future of journalism

Rosemary Barton talked about her hopes for the future of journalism as the speaker for Carleton’s Dick, Ruth and Judy Bell Lecture, held on March 28. A graduate of Carleton’s masters of journalism program, Barton is the current host of CBC’s Power & Politics television show. The lecture is an annual event to honour people who have made contributions to political and public life in Canada, according to opening remarks made by Faculty of Public Affairs (FPA) dean André Plourde. The event was held as part of FPA Research Month. “To have time to reflect on what I do and why it matters is a great thing,” Barton said at the beginning of her speech, titled “Why Journalism Matters (now […]

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Carleton hosts Peter Mansbridge for 2017 Kesterton Lecture

Peter Mansbridge spoke in front of a packed crowd of nearly 300 attendees as he delivered the 18th annual Kesterton lecture at Carleton on March 21. Mansbridge’s lecture focused on the challenges journalists face in an industry that is always changing, now more rapidly than ever, he said. The event, which was part of the Faculty of Public Affairs’ Research Month, is named in honour of Wilfred H. Kesterton, one of the founders of the School of Journalism and Communication. Mansbridge, the long-time host of CBC’s The National, will be retiring on July 1 this year. He suggested that his “face” of The National could well be replaced by the “faces” of multiple anchors, and has encouraged the CBC to […]

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