Opioids on campus: What are Canada’s post-secondary institutions doing to keep you safe?

Post-secondary students, many who have moved away from home for the first time, have the potential to face all kinds of hazards and dangers. While young adults have been known to experiment with drugs and alcohol while attending school, recent research reveals they are now at greater risk of hospitalization due to opioid overdoses. This means Canadian post-secondary institutions are now tasked with the balancing-act of educating students, while also doing their best to keep them safe from life-threatening drugs. According to a 2016 report co-authored by the Canadian Institute for Health Information and the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse, 13 people were hospitalized due to an opioid overdose on an average day in Canada in 2014-15. The report also found […]

Read more

Is marijuana-impaired driving an impending possibility?

The Trudeau government said it hopes to introduce marijuana legalization in legislation by the summer. Many Canadians believe this move is long overdue, but there are still precautions and safeguards that need to be implemented to avoid potential risks—including the possibility of an increase in stoned drivers on the roads. But what are the laws surrounding marijuana-impaired driving? Drugs and driving Provisions about drug-impaired driving are found at both the provincial and federal levels of the law, according to Eugene Oscapella, a criminology professor at the University of Ottawa (U of O) and an expert in policies and laws related to illegal drugs. At the federal level, section 253 of the Criminal Code of Canada prohibits driving or operating any […]

Read more

Health Canada eases regulation of naloxone to combat opioid deaths

Health Canada is loosening regulation of naloxone—a drug used to prevent opioid overdoses—which is now the leading cause of death among youth in Ontario. As of March 22, naloxone will be available over the counter without a prescription in a liquid form, administered via injection. Student Advocates for Public Health, a group based out of the University of Alberta, campaigned the federal government to allow Canadians to obtain naloxone without a prescription. In 2014, more than 270 people in that province died of fentanyl abuse, which opioid experts say is 50 times stronger than heroin. The advocacy group described fentanyl use in Alberta as an “epidemic.” Naloxone has often been called an “overdose antidote” because it can be used to […]

Read more