Sprott hosts first high school student competition

One hundred high school students came to Carleton’s campus to compete in a citywide business case competition on Nov. 30. Participants from five Ottawa high schools attended the event, which marked the first time the university’s Sprott School of Business has hosted it. Only the top students from each school were invited to compete on campus. Ahmed Hassan, a Grade 12 student at Longfields-Davidson Heights Secondary School, was one of them. “My first couple times doing the case studies weren’t very good,” Hassan said. “When Carleton came to [our school],  they taught us how to do them properly.” The event is part of a three-month long initiative that began in September where select Sprott students from Carleton have been attending […]

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Doc brings Sir George Williams Affair to new generation

In 1968, six students from the Caribbean attending Sir George Williams University (part of present-day Concordia University) accused their biology professor, Perry Anderson, of giving Black students in his classes lower grades than their white peers. For two weeks in January 1969, protesters demanding racial justice occupied the ninth floor of Henry F. Hall building. In its aftermath, nearly 100 students were arrested—including a sitting senator and a future statesman—and property damage totalled $2 million. The Sir George Williams Affair was Canada’s largest student occupation and perhaps one of Canada’s most significant events around race relations, but it’s probably not featured in most history textbooks. But a new documentary from the National Film Board (NFB) called Ninth Floor is attempting to […]

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Removal of professor latest free speech controversy

A Laurentian University professor has been suspended from teaching his first-year psychology class after the school discovered he had been asking his students to sign a waiver allowing for his use of vulgar language. Michael Persinger, a neuroscientist, handed out a “statement of understanding” for students to sign, in which he warned students he may use profanities and other potentially offensive language during his lectures. The statement included a list of examples, including the F-word, homophobic slurs, and explicit words for genitalia. Last December, the university provost told Persinger he would no longer be teaching the class. The incident is the latest to conjure up debates about academic freedom, free speech, and political correctness on university campuses. Persinger could not […]

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