Carleton works to improve sustainability

One of the biggest concerns for Carleton environmentally, is the contamination of waste, according to Philip Mansfield, the manager of the sustainability program at Facilities Management and Planning. “We have seen lower diversion rates in food courts and audits have shown that up to 22 percent could have been recycled,” Mansfield said in an email. “When waste goes into the wrong stream, [such as] garbage into recycling bins, not only are we reducing the amount we can divert, but we also risk recycling waste being rejected by our waste collector and ending up in landfill.” Diverted waste refers to waste that is not going to landfill and is instead being recycled in some way. Contamination of waste is caused by […]

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Students win $5,000 at first Innovation Jam

A group of nine students won $5,000 after pitching their “Complete Compost” idea at Ottawa’s first sustainability challenge Innovation Jam, held at Carleton on Nov. 9. The event was organized by Student Energy Carleton (SEC), the first Ontario chapter of an international organization that aims to develop sustainable energy alternatives to fossil fuels and foster innovation among university students. According to Roberto Chavez, SEC president, the idea of an Innovation Jam originated from an executive trip to Mexico to attend the Student Energy Summit in June. “We saw an Innovation Jam, and we thought ‘this is the coolest thing, this is what we are about.’ So we thought that the best way to start our year was to have one […]

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Editorial: Bottled water ban should stay

In 2011, the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) banned the sale of bottled water in CUSA businesses to take a strong stance on sustainability. At CUSA council this week, vice-president (finance) Craig Handy introduced a motion to repeal this ban, so Henry’s can start selling bottled water, ostensibly to add revenue. While the motion has been tabled, this is a step backwards for CUSA’s sustainability efforts on campus. If the motion passes, it would erase the positive work of a previous CUSA council. The justification is money. CUSA believes students who come to Henry’s looking for bottled water will buy it elsewhere. While it’s unclear how large the loss in profit is, CUSA argues student money should be going back […]

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Construction almost complete on new sustainability research house

The plain and oddly-located house being built at the corner of Bronson Avenue and University Drive will soon be Carleton’s newest research facility. Construction of the Carleton Research and Innovation in Sustainable Energy (C-RISE) house, also known as the Urbandale Centre for Home Energy Research, is nearing completion on the north side of campus. The building, which has a simple rectangular box design with an A-shaped roof, will allow Carleton engineering and architectural department faculty and students to test emerging residential solar energy concepts. It will eventually include solar installations on its roof and inside. “It’s a test bed for us to try out concepts we’ve studied either in the laboratory or through computer simulations—it’s a chance to do full-scale […]

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Editorial: Carleton should push for local food vendors

Students are looking for food options that mirror an increased awareness and desire for sustainable, local foods. When Ryerson University switched food suppliers on campus, the university worked with a company that focussed on bringing students local, sustainable food at a low price. Although Carleton’s contract with Aramark is ongoing, the university needs to put more pressure on the company to provide better options to students with local food providers. Food trucks are a growing trend in Ottawa and could be a great way to fill the void of locally owned and produced food on campus, without taking up too much space. Carleton’s isolated location means it isn’t usually feasible for students to go off campus to eat when they […]

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