Letter: CFS services unnecessary due to those offered by CUSA

It’s always nice when someone who has routinely been a disappointment finally decides to take interest in you. I am, of course, referring to the representatives from the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) who were kind enough to stop by the University Centre to provide pizza, hats—and reminders of why the decertification process must continue. What I found most interesting about seeing the CFS in action is that it was the first time I had actually seen the organization playing an active role in the affairs of Carleton students. With the mandatory annual $16 fee that we—a population of little less than 25,000 students—all pay to the CFS, totalling approximately $389,000 per year, there should be no need for the […]

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Editorial: The summer U-Pass isn’t solely CUSA’s initiative

The summer U-Pass was the object of a recent Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) referendum, but it isn’t solely a CUSA initiative. The pass would allow students taking one or more credit worth of classes to pay an additional fee with tuition to have a bus pass for the summer semester. This would be mandatory, which is the same in practice as the fall and winter U-Pass. CUSA hopefuls have used this pass as a platform in student elections, and used it as an example of CUSA saving students money. In reality, the decision-making process around both the U-Pass’ continuation and the summer U-Pass falls in the hands of the city as well. Although CUSA can give its blessing, go […]

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Sex and the Single Student Blog: Bleeding love or just bleeding?

University students who entertain consistent sex partners face a unique challenge in their sex lives—they’re not always in the same city as their partner. Reading weeks, summer holidays, and trips back to your hometown mean you’re not always in the same place, and it’s unlikely that your partner’s schedule corresponds. With the end of the semester fast approaching, couples all over campus cling to their loved (or lusted) ones, and it’s to be expected that study dates are punctuated by the occasional roll in the hay. For those who choose not to opt-out when either they or their partners are on their period, a further three to seven days a month might be up for grabs. Menstruation is one thing in life that men […]

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Editorial: Ask better questions on teaching evaluations

Only about 45 per cent of students fill out student evaluations each year, but the results given on these evaluations can determine the future job of the teacher in question. If an instructor receives less than a 4.0 average on the summative question at the end of the evaluation, they are required to create an action plan with the chair head of their department. If another evaluation produces the same average below 4.0, the instructor is essentially fired from teaching that course. But with questions asking whether the teacher spoke audibly or returned assignments promptly, the evaluations hardly feel like worthwhile assessments of a teacher’s role in the classroom. This is less than inspiring to a student as they rush […]

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Editorial: Collaboration between RRRA and students could fix referendum turnout

Only about 150 students voted in the Rideau River Residence Association’s (RRRA) referendum, which was asking students to increase RRRA’s levy by $5 a semester. This represents an abysmal four per cent of the total population living in residence. This increase is about 14 per cent, decided by a paltry sum of students. While students living in residence must take the initiative, the larger failing is clearly with RRRA for being complacent with apathy at best. The timing of the vote alone discourages students from voting as it is the busiest time of year. Not only that, but students, especially—first-years—are looking forward to next year when many will move off-campus. RRRA knows this and could combat the “who cares” attitude […]

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