Letter: Changing O Canada lyrics won’t promote equality

“O Canada! Our home and native land! True patriot love, in all thy sons command.” Canadians from far and wide know these lyrics, having belted them out with our countrymen thousands of times. To proud citizens, “O Canada” is a source of national pride, true identity, and most obviously, a source of blatant sexism. Wait – what!? According to the 225 supporters of Bill C-210 within the House of Commons, this is the case. Proposed by MP Mauril Bélanger in May, Bill C-210 would change the lyrics “in all thy sons command” to “in all of us command.” The bill has made it through three readings and discussions and will soon enter the Senate. Canadians could potentially have a “new” […]

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Lower enrolment could mean smaller CUSA budget

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) could have its budget reduced in the future if the number of students enrolling at Carleton drops, according to a report at the university’s Senate meeting. CUSA president Fahd Alhattab presented the Senate’s findings to CUSA council at its Feb. 29 meeting. “The presentation by Duncan Watt, vice-president (finance) for the university, regarding the financial situation of the university is quite interesting and quite concerning for the health of the student union in the future,” he told other councillors. He said Carleton will see a downward trend of student recruitment in line with population changes in Ontario. “There are just less 18-year-olds in Ontario. Less 18-year-olds means less students at Carleton, less students at […]

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GSA proposes Academic Amnesty Day, motion fails at Carleton’s senate

The Graduate Students’ Association (GSA) presented a motion to Carleton’s senate meeting Sept. 25 to declare Oct. 19 Academic Amnesty Day. If it’s a success, students would be exempt from attending class that day to vote in the upcoming federal election. To encourage students to vote in this year’s election, the GSA introduced the motion for Academic Amnesty Day to Carleton’s senate, arguing many students may find it difficult or near impossible to vote at their local polling station during the hours of poll operation without missing class, usually with a penalty. “Most of us want to have a say in who runs our country, but if we have a day packed full of classes and no time to wait […]

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Letter: Combine Thanksgiving and reading week for a longer summer

How is Carleton University different from all but two other Ontario universities? The answer is that Carleton, along with McMaster and Ryerson, are the only Ontario universities with classes that start before Labour Day, which really doesn’t make any sense. Classes at Carleton start for the fall semester on Sept. 2, 2015. According to an email from the university, this in an effort to “ensure the Senate guidelines are adhered to allowing at least 62 teaching days; incorporating fall break the last week in October and scheduling 13 days of final examinations ending by Dec. 22.” Why is it then, that Wilfred Laurier University, which also has a fall reading week, starts class on September 10? Why does Brock University, […]

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President profile: Dan Crich for Act Now Carleton

After years of experience with Carleton’s Academic Student Government, Carleton’s senate, and being a Faculty of Public Affairs co-ordinator, Dan Crich said he is ready to take his student politics involvement to the next step. Crich, a fourth-year political science student, is currently sitting as a public affairs councillor on Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) council. He is running for CUSA president under the slate ACT Now Carleton. Crich said, if elected, ACT Now Carleton aims to focus on increasing financial transparency, reviewing executive benefits, and increasing funding for student services. “We think that executive benefits are a little bit too much for students,” he said. “Just because you’re an executive for a student union doesn’t mean that you’re better […]

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