Editorial: Runte resignation signals fresh start

Carleton President Roseann Runte announced on March 24 that she would be resigning her post, effective July 31. Runte has been the head of the university for nine years, taking on the job in 2008 and seeking a second term in 2012. This change in leadership represents an opportunity for a fresh start for Carleton, and especially for the university’s Board of Governors (BoG). A number of contentious issues on campus, including the passing of the Sexual Violence Policy, rising tuition fees, and changes limiting the ability of BoG members to express their dissent on actions or decisions taken by the Board, have created a disconnect between students and the university. For nearly a decade, Runte has played a key […]

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Carleton President Roseann Runte announces new position

Carleton President Roseann Runte will be taking over as president and CEO of the Canada Foundation for Innovation (CFI). The news comes after she announced her resignation as president of Carleton on March 24. Runte will be stepping down from her role as president of the university on July 31, and her new job will start on August 1. According to a press release, the CFI chose Runte after “an extensive search assisted by an independent consulting firm.” Runte has been the president of the university for the past nine years and her resignation comes a year before her second term was set to expire in 2018. More to come.

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Free speech on campus: an in-depth look

The topic of free speech on university campuses continues to provoke debate and criticism in the wake of recent on-campus incidents.  One incident saw Carleton University President Roseann Runte coming under scrutiny in January, after an email titled “A Reflection for 2017” was sent out to students to promote the principle of free speech. The email was sent following various protests on campus in the fall semester. The email appeared to call campus protesters “noisy persons” who “fail to recognize [that] by preventing their duly-elected representatives to carry out their mandate, they themselves are contravening the basic principle of a civil society.” Samiha Rayeda, the volunteer, outreach, and programming coordinator for Carleton’s Ontario Public Interest Research Group (OPIRG), said the term […]

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Carleton votes on tuition increase while students protest outside

The Carleton Board of Governors (BoG) voted on Feb. 2 to raise the cost of tuition at the university by the maximum allowable amount for the next two academic years. The three per cent average annual increase means the tuition cost of some programs will go up less, but others will go up more. Under the plan approved by the BoG, domestic annual tuition rates will increase by three per cent in the 2017-18 year and the 2018-19 school year, respectively. Fees for international students will increase three to eight per cent in each school year. Fahd Alhattab and Greg Owens, the two undergraduate student representatives, along with Michael Bueckert, the graduate student representative, were the only members on the BoG […]

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Carleton hosts budget town hall

Carleton hosted a budget town hall meeting on Jan. 16 to outline the challenges faced with the changing framework of Ontario funding for post-secondary institutions. Changes in demographics are also posing some challenges, according to Michel Piché, Carleton’s vice-president (finance and administration). Piché presented the information on Carleton’s financial situation at the public meeting. “We’re having to deal with an interesting situation of significant changes in government policies that will impact not just one area, but many different areas, and will have an effect on how we budget for next year and also the coming years,” he said. Piché said demographic shifts mean there will be fewer 18-year-olds in Ontario (the age of most first-year students), which could mean lower […]

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