Canadian law students participate in research-a-thon for refugees

Law students across Canada took part in a joint research effort on Feb. 4 to review legal arguments that could help individuals targeted by the proposed U.S. travel ban. The travel ban, which has now been refuted by the Supreme Court in America, prohibits people with citizenship from seven countries of primarily Muslim faith from entering the U.S., and stopped the intake of Syrian refugees until further notice. The 12-hour “research-a-thon” event was organized by three law students at McGill University, and included over 800 participants from all 22 of Canada’s law schools, according to Brodie Noga, one of the event’s organizers. Participants also raised $8,800 in donations for the Canadian Council of Refugees. Noga said the idea began as […]

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Letter: “Anti-Canadian” values are difficult to define

Member of Parliament Kellie Leitch of Canada’s Conservative party proposed screening new immigrants for “anti-Canadian values” earlier in September through an email survey sent out by her campaign, resulting in expected attacks on what exactly Leitch means when she says “anti-Canadian.” This is typical of Leitch’s dog-whistle politics, as she attempts to appeal to “old stock” Canadians—that is, those who may harbour feelings of “concern” towards the immigrant community, otherwise known as badly-disguised Islamophobia. This is not the first time Leitch has targeted the Muslim community. During the federal election campaign in 2015, Leitch promoted a hotline to protect women from “barbaric cultural practices,” such as arranged marriages. She promptly apologized for this on national television just as she embarked on […]

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GSA, WUSC launch petition asking Carleton to do more for refugees

The Graduate Students’ Association (GSA) has put an open letter online urging Carleton to do more to bring Syrian refugees to Canada. As of Nov. 18, the letter had 199 signatures. The letter was written as a collective effort between the World University Service of Canada (WUSC), the GSA, the Carleton University Academic Staff Association, and the Canadian Union of Public Employees Local 4600. “What the letter calls for is for more institutional support,” GSA president Michael Bueckert said. “In addition to private fundraising, more things can be done for those students that are brought in through the WUSC program.” Bueckert said the letter recommends waiving tuition and residence fees, as well as financing textbooks and school supplies for WUSC […]

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Editorial: Carleton’s refugee support efforts are embarrassing

Despite the federal government’s goal of bringing 25,000 refugees to Canada by next year, Carleton supports only two refugees. The university supports two students at a cost of $20,000 per year for each, with the help of the World University Service of Canada (WUSC). There is talk of supporting two more refugees, but Carleton said they will need funding for this to happen. The Graduate Students’ Association (GSA) submitted a letter signed by WUSC stating that Carleton was not doing enough. The letter noted that Ottawa Mayor Jim Watson didn’t include Carleton as one of the education partners he thanked for their work with the refugee crisis at the Mayor’s Forum on Syrian Refugee Resettlement Efforts. Carleton is a wealthy […]

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Carleton researchers receive grants for refugee, military, Indigenous studies

A number of Carleton research projects received a boost from the Canadian government’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) earlier this week in the form of public grants. “They’re very prestigious—only about 50 per cent of applications are funded,” explained Carleton researcher James Milner, a recipient of one of the SSHRC’s $25,000 Connection grants. “What the adjudication board was looking for were very developed, thoughtful, and well-articulated proposals to dedicate public funds toward.” Totalling $750,000, the grants given to Carleton will be directed into multiple fields of research, including global Indigenous studies, military oversight and control, and Milner’s area of expertise: refugee policy. The assistant professor of political science has acted quickly in putting his $25,000 grant to work, […]

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