Winter weather hinders accessibility on campus

Snowy weather this winter season may be a chilly inconvenience for some students, but for others, it’s a challenge to get around. Brett Babcock, a Carleton student who identifies as physically disabled, said that winter becomes incredibly difficult for those with disabilities. “It is difficult being trapped inside, not being able to go outside and getting fresh air,” he said. “I’m a competitive track and field racer, so I’m used to training all spring, summer and fall, so being cooped up inside takes a toll on your mentality and your well-being.” He added that snow makes public transit inaccessible, both on and off-campus. “There is a space between the sidewalk and bus that’s not always plowed, so sometimes the bus […]

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Navigating university life while deaf

Everyone knows how it feels to start at the bottom of a new institution, especially in university. You’re often far away from home, feeling homesick in a new surrounding. That is until you finally meet someone who you share things in common with. Josh Gomes, a first-year sustainable and renewable energy engineering student, said he learned he wasn’t alone when he first met two other deaf students at Carleton in September. Before coming to Carleton, Gomes lived in Cambridge, Ont., where he said he pushed himself to break the stigmas attached to deafness. “I always try to prove people that [deaf and dumb] is not true,” he said. Gomes has worn hearing aids in both ears since he was diagnosed […]

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Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind seeks Carleton students

The Canadian Guide Dogs for the Blind are seeking volunteers to train future guide dogs, and are looking specifically for students at Carleton. Volunteers train dogs, eight to 16 weeks of age, for 12 to 18 months. From there, the dogs go into formal training with Canadian Guide Dogs staff. “Right now, we have more puppies than volunteers so we are in a bit of a desperation stage at the moment,” Steven Doucette, the organization’s events and guider coordinator, said. According to Doucette, there are usually 60 to 80 volunteers a year, but fewer in the middle of winter and summer. Volunteers spend the majority of their time with the puppies. For students, this includes taking them to class and […]

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On-campus memorials prove costly

On-campus memorials can be a tricky issue for students. There are questions about price, type, and location that are difficult to find answers for during the busy school semesters. June Cummings, a sociology student at Carleton, said she was looking to plant a tree on campus in memory of a colleague, but that it was too expensive. “It’s hindering and very expensive if you want to do this.  As a student, I found it frustrating,” she said. “I didn’t think it would be so official and such a big deal, I went to Facilities Management and Planning, but it seems that when I initiated this conversation, the department was in the process of changing it around,” Cummings said. Initially, Cummings […]

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CUSA expands Accessibility Fund support

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) approved a motion at its Jan. 10 meeting to allow students with disabilities to apply for academic funding if their other options through the Paul Menton Centre (PMC) have been exhausted. The motion was first introduced as a result of a female student not being able to access funding for academic help from the PMC because she does not qualify for the Ontario Student Assistance Program funding from the provincial government, according to Ashley Courchene, CUSA vice-president (student services).   The student was aware of the CUSA Accessibility Fund, but the rules around it were worded as though it only mandated for accessibilty to CUSA events and spaces, according to Courchene. Her application was […]

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