Letter: Provincial candidates must better engage youth vote

In about six months, Ontario will hold a general election to determine its next premier. For the Conservatives, this election is a ray of hope to end the 15-year Liberal hold on the Premier’s office with the newly appointed leader of Ontario’s Conservative Party, Patrick Brown. For the Liberals, on the other hand, this election will be a constant parade of the Liberal track record in Ontario as the current Premier, Kathleen Wynne, vies to remain in office. The upcoming election, however, means something different for student voters—many of whom are likely to be voting for the first time. Students, in turn, must decide whether they have any interest in provincial politics and, if so, who they will cast their […]

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Letter: Increasing minimum wage isn’t as beneficial as it seems

People in Ontario have been celebrating the government’s implementation of a $14 per hour minimum wage, but I wouldn’t start popping champagne just yet. While the increase in minimum wage claims to fight poverty and improve the lives of Canada’s minimum wage workers, it fails to accomplish this for a variety of reasons. For starters, businesses almost always end up passing these increased costs onto consumers, often out of necessity. A business is only able to stay open so long as it is profitable, thus any rational business owner is looking to maximize their profits. While some may view this in a negative light, this fundamental phenomena of capitalism is what has driven up living standards and productivity over the […]

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Minimum wage hike stirs debate at Carleton

After Ontario’s minimum wage increased by more than 20 per cent in January, Carleton businesses are readjusting their business models to balance the increase. On Jan. 1, Ontario’s general minimum wage increased to $14 per hour from $11.60 for workers who are 18 years or older. Meanwhile, the minimum wage for servers went from $10.10 to $12.20 per hour. The Graduate Students’ Association (GSA) owns and operates Mike’s Place, a bar in the University Centre. Taylor Howarth, the GSA’s vice-president (finance), said the wage increase is not “a major hurdle,” but requires planning to adjust. “On the book’s analysis . . . it’s going to cost Mike’s Place more money,” Howarth said. “If you look at it from a labour […]

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Editorial: Strike intervention should have happened sooner

As college students across Ontario returned to school this week, many are feeling let down by the system that left them without classes for five weeks. It was the longest college strike in Ontario history. One can only wonder why the Ontario government didn’t pressure the colleges and union to come to an agreement sooner to save the semester for almost 500,000 college students. The result of the strike is students’ lives are being disrupted for the second time this semester, as they return to classes with cut curriculums, a shortened Christmas break, and disrupted travel plans. In a town hall hosted on Nov. 20, Ontario premier Kathleen Wynne answered questions from college students about why she failed to intervene. […]

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Back-to-work legislation ends college faculty strike

The Ontario government passed back-to-work legislation on Nov. 19, ending the five-week college strike. Faculty returned to work on Nov. 20, and classes started again the following day. The legislation was passed after the Ontario Public Service Employees Union (OPSEU), with a 95 per cent turnout, rejected the College Employer Council’s new contract offer by 86 per cent. Ontario’s Premier Kathleen Wynne introduced the back-to-work legislation on Nov. 16 but it was voted down by the New Democratic Party. The legislature tabled the bill again on the weekend and the vote passed on Nov. 19. “It was incredibly heavy handed on the part of the government and incredibly late for an intervention on their part,” said JP Hornick, chair of […]

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