Editorial: Consult Indigenous students about Mawandoseg

Last week, The Charlatan reported that the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) has decided to cut the office space for the Mawandoseg Centre—its Indigenous service centre. The association is working to move Mawandoseg’s co-ordinator to the administration-run Ojigkwanong Centre to save on room rental costs. Considering the colonial history of Carleton, which is built on unceded Algonquin territory, Indigenous students have every right to meet in different places on campus that are specific to them. While both Mawandoseg and Ojigkwanong offer Indigenous students a place to visit and practice their culture, there’s a disconnect in their mandates that is important to understand. Mawandoseg is run by students, for students, so it allows student leaders and visitors to meet on an […]

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CUSA debates cutting Indigenous centre space

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) is considering removing its designated Indigenous service centre space, the Mawandoseg Centre, and moving the centre’s co-ordinator to the university-run Ojigkwanong Centre. CUSA president Zameer Masjedee said the proposal would save the association rental costs for the centre, which would be reinvested into programming. According to him, it doesn’t make sense for Indigenous services to be split between two different student centres. “Ultimately, we thought that this way, it would be better serving all students for the services that they’re looking to get out of each of these centres,” Masjedee said. According to CUSA’s website, Mawandoseg is the “leading point of contact for non-Indigenous students looking to connect and learn more about Indigenous cultures and […]

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Carleton brings in Indigenous artwork

The Centre of Indigenous Initiatives at Carleton recently unveiled a number of Indigenous art installations in the Ojigkwanong Centre. The art pieces are by Indigenous artists Jaime Koebel, Heather Campbell, and Carleton faculty and students. The goal behind the work was “to help create a welcoming space for students,” according to the Carleton Newsroom. Koebel, Campbell, and Simon Brascoupé managed the art instillation. Koebel said she was commissioned to create works that would help students “feel comfortable in the space by being able to ‘read’ aspects of its imagery from their communities.” One of the pieces of art was a collaborative large-scale triptych painting on canvas co-created by Koebel, Campbell, and Brascoupé. The background was made by using the large […]

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