Review: Marvel’s The Defenders

Marvel and Netflix’s The Defenders brings together the protagonists from each of its four previous shows (Luke Cage, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist, and Daredevil) to form one team of super-powered heroes to defend New York City. They do this to a fairly good degree, but I find them lacking in a few areas. The show takes its time getting its main characters in the same room, but even though it takes three episodes or so, the pay-off isn’t bad. The actors have great chemistry on-screen and are at their best when they’re interacting with one another, in pairs or in the group. Every actor in the entire show does an admirable job with their character, including Sigourney Weaver as the mysterious Alexandra. However, despite the well-done […]

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Review: Netflix’s Death Note disappoints with whitewashed adaptation

“The human whose name is written in this note shall die.” It’s a pretty straightforward concept with a wealth of storytelling potential. It’s also the basis of the Death Note series of manga, anime, and films. The most popular story to come out of this series is that of Light Yagami—spelled with the Japanese kanji for “Moon Night God” if you’re feeling pretentious. After a Shinigami (death god) Ryuk drops his ‘death note’—which grants the user the ability to kill any human by simply writing their name in it, in the human world—high schooler Light Yagami decides to use the notebook to reshape the world in his vision by becoming the widely-beloved god of justice Kira, killing criminals and those […]

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Editorial: Movies, T.V. should better reflect multiculturalism

Despite the ever-increasing multicultural nature of our world, it is yet to be accurately reflected in the media we consume. Hollywood and various content creators have come under scrutiny in recent years for lacking representation and for white-washing pieces that belong to other cultures. While adaptations of movies and shows facilitate the exchange of cultures and culture sharing, it’s important not to lose the nuances of the culture in the process. Recently, Netflix’s adaptation of the Japanese manga Death Note came under fire for white-washing and failing to have a cast that accurately represents the original characters. Similarly, a live-action remake of Aladdin was also criticized when actress Naomi Scott was officially cast as Princess Jasmine, as she did not […]

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Review: Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa’s Riverdale

Growing up, Archie Comics were a huge part of my childhood. My elementary school self wanted to grow up and become a teenager quickly so I could be like Archie and his crew at Riverdale High—having fun at school dances, hanging out at the chocolate shop, and driving to the beach. Archie Andrews, Betty Cooper, and Veronica Lodge were the iconic fictional love triangle of my elementary school years. The comics were a place for hijinks and good, clean fun. I’ve grown up since then, and my teenage years were never the sunny days pictured in Riverdale. They were filled with angst, drama, and homework. And new CW/Netflix show Riverdale certainly brings angst and drama to the idyllic small-town world […]

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Review: Mark Hudis and Barry Sonnenfeld’s A Series of Unfortunate Events

I was seven years old when I had my first encounter with Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events (ASOUE). At that time the latest release in the series was the ninth book, The Carnivorous Carnival, and rumors of a film adaptation had just begun to spread. When Paramount released their take on the series two years later, I was so enthralled with the books that I was well-equipped to be disappointed by the film. It is for this reason that, my response to Netflix’s plan to adapt the first four books in the series into an eight-part television season was, for a while, invariably one of cautious optimism. But I can now say with certainty that Netflix’s adaptation has […]

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