Review: Tero Saarinen’s Morphed

Morphed was presented at the National Arts Centre (NAC)on the 4th and 5th of October. The 60-minute contemporary dance performance attempts to answer the question: “What makes a man, a man?” and showcases Tero Saarinen, Finnish dance prodigy’s insights on it. The piece was very subtle and open with no lyrical music or speech used whatsoever, other than the dancing of the seven male dancers on stage. It evoked a sense of inquiry with no answer, and allowed the audience to explore their own ideas and notions of maleness, masculinity, and manhood. The dancers themselves, who were all male-presenting and mostly white, were of lean and strong stature, yet effortlessly exuded gracefulness through their expressive dance. The piece was made up […]

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Mother Mother rocks the NAC

Mother Mother took the stage at the National Arts Centre (NAC) and did not disappoint their fans, both old and new. The band struck a great balance between performing their older singles and new hits off their sixth and latest album. The NAC is gorgeous, with deep crimson seats and balcony seating. But any venue would have been enthusiastically welcomed as the temperature outside dropped to -16 °C. Thankfully, the venue was so packed that fingers and toes warmed up quickly, just in time for the opening act, K. Flay. She started the night off with a mix of rap, alt-rock and electronic music—a strange combination that worked well, and this is coming from someone who is not a fan […]

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Commentary: Gord Downie’s Secret Path

This past summer, Canadians came together to celebrate the Tragically Hip, one of the country’s most iconic musical acts. In Dec. 2015, Gord Downie, the band’s frontman and key songwriter, was diagnosed with glioblastoma, a rare terminal brain tumour. In May, the band announced the diagnosis, as well as the dates for what would likely be their final tour, the all-Canadian Man Machine Poem Tour. Nearly a month after the Hip performed their final show in their hometown, Kingston, Ontario, with over 11 million people watching live on CBC, Downie announced a new multimedia project about one of the darkest parts of Canadian history: Indigenous residential schools. Between the early 1880s and 1996, over 150,000 First Nations, Métis and Inuit […]

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Scharf continues music career at the Ice House

Fans of the Ravens men’s hockey team might be familiar with the sound of a pipe organ filling the Ice House with tunes during games, but most do not know the face behind the music. Third-year Carleton student Spencer Scharf, a music performance student, has been playing the organ at Ravens hockey games since 2014. The dean of the music department gave Scharf the chance to play at home games after listening to Scharf play the organ “by ear.” He said he can read sheet music, but prefers to play music based on memory at hockey games. During one game, Scharf played the theme to the 1999 science fiction comedy film Galaxy Quest. It might seem like a random song […]

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Commentary: Djanet Sears play is ambitious, beautiful

The Adventures of a Black Girl in Search of God is a bit of a mess–a big, ambitious, beautiful mess. Djanet Sears’ two-act musical drama, which is currently showing at the National Arts Centre, tackles an overwhelming variety of themes: grief, racism, spirituality, death, and motherhood are all explored onstage. Those with short attention spans, beware—the whole thing clocks in at nearly two and a half hours. The play opens with a harrowing scene. Lorraine “Rainey” Johnson, a doctor and mother, tries futilely to save her five-year-old daughter Jainey, who succumbs to meningitis. Three years later, Rainey, played with intensity by Lucinda Davis, is still trying to grapple with the trauma. She’s lost faith in her ability as a doctor. […]

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