Editorial: Roommate conflicts can be amplified by social media

With lack of communication being so core to many conflicts, including roommate conflicts, the increased presence of social media in university students’ lives is not helping at all. Perhaps being so used to communicating our thoughts and feelings virtually has caused the deterioration of many students’ ability to communicate face-to-face. Social media has made conflict resolution much more difficult, especially when conflicts can become more magnified by passive aggression expressed through the different channels of Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and Twitter. When talking things over in person takes a backseat to sub-Tweeting your roommate drama online, students’ conflict resolution skills suffer as a result. Disagreements over how clean your shared living space needs to be, or over how loud your music […]

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Letter: Reduced course loads should mean lower tuition

Everyone knows tuition fees are expensive and everyone complains, but this isn’t your typical ‘tuition fees are too high’ argument. Students who opt to take four credits each year actually end up paying even more to complete their degree. If you break it down, a typical undergraduate degree has students fulfill 20 credits, and to graduate in four years—a pressure most students are faced with—they must take at least five credits each year of study. But what if you can’t handle the stress of a full course load? Or you have a demanding part-time job? Or you have some sort of disability that prevents you from successfully completing a five-credit course load? Well, surprise! You’ll be paying more in tuition […]

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Opinion: Peer pressure doesn’t stop in university

As campus becomes a newfound discovery among first-years, many do not notice how quickly it will change into a breeding ground of chaos and stress.  The first week of school is filled with the excitement of meeting new students, making connections, and feeling the need to impress those who people make connections with. Peer pressure is hard to avoid whether people like it or not, but when it comes down to it, how students handle these situations is of great importance. As time passes, and connections grow stronger, those new to the campus scene will get invites to outings and parties where they may begin to feel pressured by certain people or to live up to the expectation of being […]

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Letter: Campus suicide prevention needs to improve

Since 2010, the suicide rate among young adults has been steadily increasing; however, nobody can accurately say how many of those recorded are student suicides. This year has seen several student suicides across Ontario campuses, including at the University of Waterloo and the University of Guelph, but despite a  plea from medical professionals, neither universities nor local coroners are keeping track of how many campus suicides happen per year. According to Statistics Canada, which only keeps track of suicide rates by sex and age group, approximately 438 individuals between the ages of 15 and 24 died by suicide in 2013, and this number is continuing to increase. Many universities are attempting to focus on mental health awareness, and providing better […]

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Editorial: Frosh needs to better address mental health

This week, students from across the country—and in some cases, across the world—will descend on Carleton’s campus to begin their university careers. For many of these students, this will be the first time they’re living on their own—a huge transition in itself, never mind the huge shift in workload compared to high school. Fall Orientation activities are designed to make incoming students feel welcome, and get them acclimated to the campus. While frosh events mostly succeed in doing this, they’re missing one key element: mental health. Most students who come to campus in the fall are not completely prepared for the massive adjustment, nor are they prepared for the feelings of overwhelming sadness or anxiety they might experience as a […]

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