Demand for youth mental health services on the rise, study finds

Demand for youth mental health services in Canada is on the rise according to a recent investigation by the Toronto Star and the Ryerson School of Journalism. Data collected from youth across the country reveals a dramatic increase in both the number of young people seeking mental health services, and the costs associated with meeting the demand. The study surveyed 15 Canadian colleges and universities, and found that all but one have increased their mental health budgets over the past fivew years, with the average increase being 35 per cent. The investigation also included a major survey of 25,164 Ontario university students by the American College Health Association, which found that between 2013 and 2016, there was a 50 per […]

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Letter: Millennials are not prepared for the real world

As a society changes, so too does the mindset of the people within it. This is seen clearly in the change of each new generation, as they have learnt from the mistakes and triumphs of previous generations, and use this to change and base their lives on. The education around them adapts to these new changes, and shapes their children. But with the increase in mental health warnings and anti-bullying campaigns, is our generation really being shaped to deal with the rest of the world? I believe new generations are not taught to be prepared for what the world will throw at them. As an example, in my political science class, we were discussing our upcoming presentations for our research […]

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SAMH launches campaign for healthcare funding

Carleton’s Student Mental Health Advocacy Collective (SMHAC), along with the Student Alliance for Mental Health (SAMH) is petitioning the government to re-commit to a single National Health Accord, using the hashtag #Fight4Health. Greg Owens, president of SAMH, said the petition aims to provide adequate funding to meet the growing need for mental health care. “The purpose of the petition is a call on the federal government to reinstate a national health accord, and reverse the slashes to growth in funding of health care to each province and territory,” Owens said. In 2004, the Health Accord was projected to improve patient care in Canada with a $41 billion injection over a decade, in a legal agreement between the federal, provincial, and […]

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Opinion: Bell Let’s Talk should prioritize action

On Jan. 25, Canadians had the opportunity to participate in the annual Bell Let’s Talk campaign. This campaign has been plastered all over social media, television, and the sides of buses in an effective, albeit overly branded, manner. But who does Bell Let’s Talk really serve—and has it really created social change? First and foremost, Bell Let’s Talk benefits Bell. This type of strategy is referred to as “cause marketing,” and is an effective means of branding your company as socially conscious and thus an ethical alternative to competitors. Prior to beginning this campaign, Bell’s average annual stock price was plummeting. But since the inception of Bell Let’s Talk, the stock price has been climbing back steadily. The truth is, […]

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Carleton PhD student helps Peel police save $113,000

A partnership between a Carleton PhD student and the Peel Regional Police has saved the police force an estimated $113,000 in the first six months. Michael Halinski, a student in the Sprott School of Business, worked together with police to create a more efficient way of dealing with mental health crises to save both man hours and budget costs. Peel police began to have problems when reductions in the social services’ budget, as well as the closure of mental health hospitals, resulted in the police having to take on more responsibilities, according to Halinski. This came at an increased cost to the force, as officers would regularly spend hours—sometimes an entire shift—waiting with mental health patients before they were assessed […]

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