Ontario Sunshine List reveals university pay levels

The release of Ontario’s Public Sector Salary Disclosure list on March 31 highlighted a continuing gender wage gap among university employees. Published annually since 1996, the Sunshine List provides the salary and benefits of every public sector employee earning more than $100,000 in the previous year. This year’s list has grown by seven per cent, with more than 123,000 people paid more than $100,000 last year, according to CBC News. Carleton president Roseann Runte is once again the highest paid employee at Carleton. Earning a total of $400,004.97 in 2016, Runte was one of three women amongst the top 10 highest paid Carleton employees last year. Sprott School of Business associate dean of professional graduate programs Lorraine Dyke was fourth, earning […]

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Universities work to incorporate Indigenous learning

Among the 94 calls to action published by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in a 2015 report were numerous references to the need for increased education about Indigenous issues, including a call for governments to “provide the necessary funding to post-secondary institutions to educate teachers on how to integrate Indigenous knowledge and teaching methods in classrooms.” Some Canadian universities are working to better recognize Indigenous knowledge on their campuses, from the implementation of Indigenous content requirements, to the creation of buildings dedicated to Indigenous studies and culture. Lakehead University Following the implementation of an Indigenous content requirement in the fall 2016 semester, Lakehead University is working to address student concerns about the information being taught. “There have been some disagreements […]

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Rosemary Barton talks the future of journalism

Rosemary Barton talked about her hopes for the future of journalism as the speaker for Carleton’s Dick, Ruth and Judy Bell Lecture, held on March 28. A graduate of Carleton’s masters of journalism program, Barton is the current host of CBC’s Power & Politics television show. The lecture is an annual event to honour people who have made contributions to political and public life in Canada, according to opening remarks made by Faculty of Public Affairs (FPA) dean André Plourde. The event was held as part of FPA Research Month. “To have time to reflect on what I do and why it matters is a great thing,” Barton said at the beginning of her speech, titled “Why Journalism Matters (now […]

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U of O student finds black mould in residence unit

Student housing at the University of Ottawa (U of O) has been working to address concerns of black mould being present in at least one residence building. Dev Thain, a masters of business administration student at U of O currently living with a roommate in Brooks residence building, said problems with his basement unit began on “day one” of his rental. “We got an inspector to come to the unit, and we found a lot of black mould,” Thain said. “My housemate is coughing a lot.” According to Health Canada’s website, mould is caused by damp conditions and is often found on drywall, wood, and carpeting. By breathing in the spores released by mould, people can experience coughing, shortness of […]

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Slates vs independent candidates in CUSA elections: What’s the difference?

Walking through the tunnels on a cold winter’s day may seem like a blissful escape from the latest installment of Ottawa’s winter, but at the end of January, it’s near impossible to avoid the flurry of flyers and faces of fellow students as Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) election candidates vie for potential votes. While some students go out of their way to avoid eye contact or wear headphones in a silent plea to be left alone, few can escape being handed a flyer and getting asked to cast their ballots a certain way. But how do CUSA elections really work on campus? We attempt to break it down: The slate-independent rivalry in recent years Under names that suggest unity, […]

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