Letter: Don’t understate sexual violence through partisan politics

On the evening of Jan. 25, the #MeToo movement came alive in our own backyard as allegations against Patrick Brown, the former Ontario Progressive Conservatives (PC) party leader, surfaced. We watched as his executive team members released consecutive statements that they would be resigning from positions as campaign manager, chief of staff and Ontario PC press secretary. He stood alone at the emergency press conference held at Queen’s Park in the early morning and assured the public that these allegations were “categorically untrue” and since he grew up with sisters, such claims could not be true. He then exited the building quickly, but not before telling the press, “I will be at work in the morning.” Brown then resigned a […]

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Letter: Provincial candidates must better engage youth vote

In about six months, Ontario will hold a general election to determine its next premier. For the Conservatives, this election is a ray of hope to end the 15-year Liberal hold on the Premier’s office with the newly appointed leader of Ontario’s Conservative Party, Patrick Brown. For the Liberals, on the other hand, this election will be a constant parade of the Liberal track record in Ontario as the current Premier, Kathleen Wynne, vies to remain in office. The upcoming election, however, means something different for student voters—many of whom are likely to be voting for the first time. Students, in turn, must decide whether they have any interest in provincial politics and, if so, who they will cast their […]

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Letter: Increasing minimum wage isn’t as beneficial as it seems

People in Ontario have been celebrating the government’s implementation of a $14 per hour minimum wage, but I wouldn’t start popping champagne just yet. While the increase in minimum wage claims to fight poverty and improve the lives of Canada’s minimum wage workers, it fails to accomplish this for a variety of reasons. For starters, businesses almost always end up passing these increased costs onto consumers, often out of necessity. A business is only able to stay open so long as it is profitable, thus any rational business owner is looking to maximize their profits. While some may view this in a negative light, this fundamental phenomena of capitalism is what has driven up living standards and productivity over the […]

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Letter: The budget deficit is another broken promise

Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced the federal budget on March 22, and the Liberal government is again running a deficit three times larger than promised in the electoral campaign, nearing $30 billion. ($28.6 billion, to be exact.) They had campaigned on running three modest deficits of $10 billion, and said the fourth year of their mandate would end in a surplus. After all, as Prime Minister Justin Trudeau said, “budgets balance themselves.” They tried to compensate for their spending with a number of tax hikes. Ubers will now cost more, and so will alcohol. Way to make college life more expensive. But tax hikes can’t completely cover the government’s spending, resulting in the deficit. So why does it matter if […]

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Politics blog: A breakdown of the Conservative leadership race

The Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) is in the midst of a leadership race, and it is unclear what the future of the party will be. A relatively new party to the right of the political spectrum has to come together to form a strong opposition to the Liberals. To do so, they need a leader who can hold the party together the way former Prime Minister Stephen Harper did. Among the 14 candidates in the leadership race, we see how conservatives differ on a large number of issues, united mainly by fiscal policy. In the past, the division was clear: there are progressive conservatives, and there are social conservatives. However, in the era of Brexit and Donald Trump, I […]

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