Letter: Removing monuments oversimplifies history

For some, John A. Macdonald, one of our country’s founders, and Egerton Ryerson, a pioneer of public education in Ontario, no longer have a place in Canadian history, aside from being remembered as villains responsible for residential schools. Not only is this view overly simplistic, but unfair to those who contributed so much to our country. We celebrate historical figures for their accomplishments in the making of Canada as we know it. While it would be wrong to blindly worship them in light of their grave policy mistakes, we cannot simply reject their importance by measuring their views and practices by today’s standards and values regarding our current understanding of human rights. Residential schools are one of the darkest parts […]

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Letter: Monuments that glorify oppression should be removed

After the Charlottesville riots in the United States, where white supremacists gathered to “protest” the moving of a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee, a string of movements sprung up across the country to declare the need to get rid of monuments that memorialize slave owners and racists. Across the border, Canadians took the opportunity to spur conversation about addressing and removing memorials that similarly celebrate figures that were complicit in the genocide of Indigenous people. Although not a new debate, the Charlottesville riots have caused it to come to the forefront. The argument that the memorials should stay because they are sources of pride for Canadians ignores the Indigenous populations wiped away because of the actions of the […]

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Editorial: After earning renown, Carleton can still improve

Since its founding in 1942, Carleton University has come a long way. With over 24,000 full and part-time students, and more than 875 staff, the university has become nationally renowned for programs in journalism, public affairs, and high technology. Although Carleton has been a role model in the academic sphere, it still has a long way to go regarding accessibility and student policies. Everyone has felt despair when the O-train is out of service or when the stairs to Tory quad are treacherously coated with ice. Not to mention, Carleton’s sidewalks have been seriously neglected, making navigating campus extremely difficult for students and professors requiring higher accessibility. With all the political push this year to change our sexual violence policy […]

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Remembrance Day at Carleton: campus ceremonies and WWII roots

Many Canadians will pin poppies to their lapels to commemorate Remembrance Day on Nov. 11, a time to remember lives lost in times of conflict. In addition to the ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in downtown Ottawa, Carleton will be hosting its own annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the flag poles on Library Ave. This day of remembrance hits close to home, as Carleton’s own history is tied to Canada’s military. Carleton was originally founded as Carleton College in 1942, at the height of the Second World War, according to Carleton’s website. Under the guidance of Henry Marshall Tory, the first president of Carleton College and the namesake of Tory Building, the school would later become Carleton University […]

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Letter: Reconciliation involves us all

In June 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) released its final report on Canada’s Indian residential school system. The report included 94 recommendations that called upon the federal government to not only assist with improving the lives of Indigenous people in Canada, but to establish a new relationship with First Nations based on reconciliation. Thanks to the bravery of residential school survivors, a new light has been shed on Canada’s dark history. The truth has uncovered some of the most haunting effects of residential schools, but reconciliation is an ongoing, collaborative effort that involves us all. The TRC reports in its executive summary that reconciliation is not an Aboriginal problem, but a Canadian one. But what do we consider […]

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