Editorial: After earning renown, Carleton can still improve

Since its founding in 1942, Carleton University has come a long way. With over 24,000 full and part-time students, and more than 875 staff, the university has become nationally renowned for programs in journalism, public affairs, and high technology. Although Carleton has been a role model in the academic sphere, it still has a long way to go regarding accessibility and student policies. Everyone has felt despair when the O-train is out of service or when the stairs to Tory quad are treacherously coated with ice. Not to mention, Carleton’s sidewalks have been seriously neglected, making navigating campus extremely difficult for students and professors requiring higher accessibility. With all the political push this year to change our sexual violence policy […]

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Remembrance Day at Carleton: campus ceremonies and WWII roots

Many Canadians will pin poppies to their lapels to commemorate Remembrance Day on Nov. 11, a time to remember lives lost in times of conflict. In addition to the ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in downtown Ottawa, Carleton will be hosting its own annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the flag poles on Library Ave. This day of remembrance hits close to home, as Carleton’s own history is tied to Canada’s military. Carleton was originally founded as Carleton College in 1942, at the height of the Second World War, according to Carleton’s website. Under the guidance of Henry Marshall Tory, the first president of Carleton College and the namesake of Tory Building, the school would later become Carleton University […]

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Letter: Reconciliation involves us all

In June 2015, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) released its final report on Canada’s Indian residential school system. The report included 94 recommendations that called upon the federal government to not only assist with improving the lives of Indigenous people in Canada, but to establish a new relationship with First Nations based on reconciliation. Thanks to the bravery of residential school survivors, a new light has been shed on Canada’s dark history. The truth has uncovered some of the most haunting effects of residential schools, but reconciliation is an ongoing, collaborative effort that involves us all. The TRC reports in its executive summary that reconciliation is not an Aboriginal problem, but a Canadian one. But what do we consider […]

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Letter: Canadian history isn’t boring

Last week commemorated a historic milestone not seen in a millennium. Queen Elizabeth II eclipsed the reign of her predecessors. “A long life can pass through many milestones. My own is no exception,” Her Royal Majesty said. True to her words, the following day marked another milestone back home in Canada. Quietly it passed, with little hoopla and even less mention. For the first time as an independent country, Canada declared war on Sept. 10, 1939. The country had no searchlights. Barely thirteen vessels. Newfoundland still was a direct colony of Britain. None of that deterred us. By the end of the Second World War six years later, over one million Canadians—out of a pre-war population of 11 million—would take […]

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Letter: Canadians have a long history of joining foreign conflicts

Canadians enlisting in foreign militaries to fight in wars outside of our own efforts is not a new concept. The people going over to fight are part of a long tradition of Canadians who stand for human rights throughout the world. They are acting in a legal capacity, and deserve our support. The risks are high for these men and women both home and abroad, so how they conduct themselves during this conflict is as important as their reasons for joining. Canadians have been doing this since the American civil war when thousands of Canadians fought for both the Union and Confederate armies, motivated by their beliefs on slavery. Another 1,300 Canadian volunteer soldiers fought in the Spanish civil war […]

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