Health and Fitness Blog: Fight off the Freshman 15

Everyone at one point in time entering university has probably heard of the infamous “freshman 15,” the so-called 15 pounds first-year students often gain. So how can you—a bright-eyed, bushy-tailed freshman—avoid said 15 pounds? How can you stay healthy throughout the entire school year? It’s actually pretty simple. Eat a well-rounded diet and exercise. Before we get to the tips, let’s address a few things. Being healthy is 80 per cent diet and 20 per cent exercise, so believe it or not, but consuming your weight in alcohol and following that with a basket of chicken wings will not be balanced out by a bottle of water and 30 minutes of running the next day. Lastly, slimness isn’t the same […]

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The freshman 15: Is it a myth?

Every student has heard the expression, the Freshman 15—the 15 pounds a typical student gains in their first year of university. A quick Google search of “freshman 15” brings up countless articles on how to avoid putting on this freshman fat, including ones that tell students to cut out sugary foods and stop stress eating. Even though research is plentiful, the results inconsistently determine the amount of weight a first-year student can expect to gain in university. So, do students actually gain 15 pounds, or is the Freshman 15 just a myth? Only a few pounds A study for the National Institute of Health (NIH) by Nicole L. Mihalopoulos, Peggy Auinger, and Jonathan D. Klein discovered that first-year students do gain a […]

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‘Freshman 15’ is actually undergrad 11.7 lbs, study says

College freshmen are unlikely to gain 15 lbs, contrary to popular stereotypes, but on average experience significant weight gain throughout their four years of studies, according to an Auburn University study released Sept. 17. The study looked into changes in body weight, body mass index (BMI), body composition, and shape in a sample of 131 male and female students over a four-year period, starting from their freshman year. By the end of their four years, researchers found about 70 per cent of participants had gained weight, averaging an approximate 5.3 kg or about an 11.7  lb increase. While about 18 per cent of the research subjects were considered overweight at the start of the study according to their BMIs, this […]

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