CUSA council approves 2017-18 budget

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) council passed its 2017-18 budget and voted to link sexual violence prevention training to clubs and societies’ funding for the academic year at an Aug. 31 meeting. Our Turn Carleton, a sexual violence prevention taskforce spearheaded by the Graduate Students’ Association and CUSA, brought the motion to council after a previous motion to tie clubs and societies’ summer funding to sexual violence prevention training passed unanimously at a June 19 meeting. The proposal states that in order for clubs and societies to receive their full annual funding, at least five members of each group must receive training. Groups who do not meet this training requirement would only receive half of their funding after the […]

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Letter: CUSA centres should have sexual assault support training

Carleton University just finished seeking feedback from the broader university community on its draft Sexual Violence Policy. Community feedback will be considered in advance of submitting the policy to the Board of Governors for review and approval in November. As written, the draft Sexual Violence Policy does not make specific commitments to services for survivors of sexual violence, but mentions in Section 2.1 that the purpose of the policy is to ensure that university community members who experience sexual violence receive support and appropriate accommodation. The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) has a unique opportunity to play a critical role in preventing sexual violence on-campus and supporting survivors of sexual violence, by implementing mandatory peer-based support training for those operating […]

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Foot Patrol’s Guardian Program laces up for second Capital Hoops

Charlatan reporter Phelisha Cassup went on a “ride-a-long” with Carleton’s Foot Patrol and reported on their Guardian Program during the Capital Hoops Classic. While some students hit the courts and bleachers for the Capital Hoops Classic on Feb. 6, others laced up as members of Carleton’s Guardian Program for one of their most chaotic nights of the year. This year’s game is the program’s second time facilitating the basketball event. The program launched in February 2014 under Foot Patrol, a Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) service centre. Craig Handy, Foot Patrol’s administrative co-ordinator, said the Guardians were more prepared this year than in the past and this was their time to shine. The night began with a team meeting, where […]

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Foot Patrol launches Guardian Program

Foot Patrol co-ordinators have launched a new initiative called the Guardian Program to provide a safety presence for any student event, according to the group’s administrative co-ordinator, Craig Handy. Guardians will act as a unit to provide a safety presence for any student, club, society, and faculty member, Handy said. They provide crowd control, accessibility support, organize safe-walks at the end of the event, and can give a presentation on safety. “Providing unique support for student safety needs is an important way to make the Carleton community stronger and a much more inclusive place,” Handy said. “Safety is everyone’s business.” Guardian Program volunteers will not physically intervene, however Handy said they are considered first responders in case of any incidents. This […]

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Editorial: Foot Patrol not a police force

Foot Patrol’s new Guardian Program is a solid attempt at bettering student safety on campus, but it’s fundamentally flawed. The new program aims to see specially trained Foot Patrol officers provide a safety presence for student groups at events. The program can provide “crowd control, accessibility support, organizing safe-walks at the end of the event, and can present a presentation on safety if desired.” Three of those sound fine, but crowd control doesn’t sit well. If Guardians go to an event, then there must be some possibility for safety issues. If that’s the case, and students are in charge of crowd control, things could easily go wrong. Students policing other students outside of campus safety could create unnecessary conflicts. On the […]

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