Letter: Indigenous schools need more support

The government is not taking First Nations children or their education seriously. Simply compare the state of elementary and high school education between public school boards and on-reserve schools.  Theoretically, they should receive the same treatment, because here in Canada, we are all equal, of course.  However after doing some research and reading through news articles, it is painfully clear that in reality, there are quite a few disparities that are unfair to Indigenous children, especially those living in remote, northern areas.  Take, for example, the education gap estimated at between $336 million to $665 million in December 2016 by the Parliamentary Budget Officer (PBO).  This enormous gap is the difference in funding by Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) […]

Read more

Letter: Monuments that glorify oppression should be removed

After the Charlottesville riots in the United States, where white supremacists gathered to “protest” the moving of a statue of Confederate leader Robert E. Lee, a string of movements sprung up across the country to declare the need to get rid of monuments that memorialize slave owners and racists. Across the border, Canadians took the opportunity to spur conversation about addressing and removing memorials that similarly celebrate figures that were complicit in the genocide of Indigenous people. Although not a new debate, the Charlottesville riots have caused it to come to the forefront. The argument that the memorials should stay because they are sources of pride for Canadians ignores the Indigenous populations wiped away because of the actions of the […]

Read more

Conference brings Indigenous art to campus

The New Sun Conference, held on Mar. 4, was welcomed with the smell of burning sage. The conference, which began 16 years ago, is meant to generate a healthier relationship between the Indigenous community and Carleton University, according to its program. Allan Ryan, the conference’s chair, opened the proceedings with words of greeting in Algonquin, Cree, Mohawk, Inuktitut, French, and English and acknowledged the hospitality of the Algonquin peoples, on whose unceded land Ottawa is situated on. This year’s presenters highlighted the culture of healing and education across communities. The first speaker, Shane Belcourt, a Métis filmmaker from Ottawa whose work has won many awards, said “[Art] is a desire to return to the source from which we came.” He […]

Read more

Basic income pilot scheduled for 2017

A pilot project is set to launch in Ontario in April 2017 to test the potential benefits of a basic income program. Former Conservative senator and long-time advocate for basic income Hugh Segal released a discussion paper for the three-year pilot in which he suggests the government should pay participants $1,320 per month, giving an extra $500 to those with disabilities. Basic income is a no-strings-attached payment system for all residents, to help those struggling to make ends meet by providing a guaranteed income regardless of their financial position. Segal suggested in the report that the Ontario government’s basic income pilot should be tested in a community in Northern and Southern Ontario, as well as an Indigenous community “with provisions […]

Read more

Commentary: Gord Downie’s Secret Path

This past summer, Canadians came together to celebrate the Tragically Hip, one of the country’s most iconic musical acts. In Dec. 2015, Gord Downie, the band’s frontman and key songwriter, was diagnosed with glioblastoma, a rare terminal brain tumour. In May, the band announced the diagnosis, as well as the dates for what would likely be their final tour, the all-Canadian Man Machine Poem Tour. Nearly a month after the Hip performed their final show in their hometown, Kingston, Ontario, with over 11 million people watching live on CBC, Downie announced a new multimedia project about one of the darkest parts of Canadian history: Indigenous residential schools. Between the early 1880s and 1996, over 150,000 First Nations, Métis and Inuit […]

Read more
1 2 3 5