Opinion: Long-term effects of pipelines not worth it

Combating global climate change and fostering a profitable fossil fuel industry have never been compatible goals. Therefore, it’s difficult to overstate just how big of a victory it was for the environment when TransCanada decided to cancel its two pipeline projects in eastern Canada. The Energy East pipeline and the Eastern Mainline expansion project would have made oil more accessible to Eastern Canadian and global markets, bringing with it the promise of increased fuel consumption, and the greenhouse gas emissions that go with it. The growth in greenhouse gas emissions that these types of projects enable, fly in the face of Canada’s climate change goals. At a time when Canada has committed to reducing its reliance on fossil fuels, and […]

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Carleton releases residence energy and water data

Carleton has released data for energy and water usage in residence buildings during September 2013, and the numbers show dramatic changes for some buildings. The numbers are released on a monthly basis as part of the CU Go Green initiative, according to Laurie Shea, who oversees the project. The amount of water and energy used by each building is posted monthly and compared to the same month in the previous year. The building that uses the least energy and water as compared to the previous year is highlighted, Shea said. The aim, she said, is to give students who live in the buildings an idea of how much energy and water they’re using. “[It’s there] to be more aware of […]

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Power from below: Geothermal energy

The world is running out of fuel. Non-renewable energy sources like fossil fuels will one day run out, and when that happens, the world will need new sources of electricity. However, a new form of green energy may be on the rise. Geothermal electricity is energy derived from the Earth’s inner heat. Very simply, “geothermal” means ‘earth heat’, says the website of CanGEA, the Canadian Geothermal Energy Association. “On a large scale, the intensity of this thermal energy increases with depth… [because] the temperature of the Earth increases as we travel closer to its centre,” the website said. The most common example of natural geothermal energy is through natural hot springs, such as those found in Nordic countries. This extreme […]

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