Executive candidates square off in debate

Executive candidates running in the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) elections faced off against each other in a debate on Feb. 6. Several major topics were brought up including mental health, the Sexual Violence Policy, inclusivity, diversity, and transparency. Four out of six available executive positions are running uncontested—president, vice-president (internal), vice-president (student services), and vice-president (finance)—leading to a shorter, quieter debate compared to previous years. Vice-president (student life) Current CUSA vice-president (student life) Abdullah Jaber from the One Carleton slate debated against independent candidate Nadeem Fayed. Jaber promised a Panda Week, as opposed to the three-day Panda Game celebration he introduced in his last term as vice-president. He also promised to host a “kick-off” party. Fayed discussed issues of […]

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Presidential candidate profile: David Oladejo

David Oladejo is a fourth-year engineering student running as a presidential candidate in the 2018 Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) executive elections. Oladejo is campaigning as part of the One Carleton slate, and is running uncontested. He has been involved with the Student Experience Office, Fall Orientation, the Campus Activity Board, Red Zone (a group dedicated to cheering on varsity sports teams at Carleton), and Hatch, CUSA’s entrepreneurship centre. “I was really looking for a way to stay involved with the Carleton community while still being able to have an impact on students,” Oladejo said. He said the lack of competition for executive positions—four of which are uncontested—bothers him. He said discussion and competition is “super healthy” for student government, […]

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Millennials less proud of Canada than older generations: poll

The results of a national poll on Canadian values and beliefs was released by the CBC and the Angus Reid Institute earlier this month, revealing younger Canadians aren’t as proud of Canada as older citizens. The poll showed 65 per cent of Canadians over the age of 65 were “very proud” of their country, while that figure dropped to just 40 per cent for those between 18 and 34 years of age. There is also a direct relationship between age and national pride, with the number of people who responded as being “very proud” of Canada increasing with each age bracket. Forty-seven per cent of respondents between the ages of 35-44 reported being “very proud” of Canada. This number changed […]

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