Letter: Science should engage, rather than alienate

Governor General Julie Payette recently delivered a speech at the ninth annual Canadian Science Policy Conference in Ottawa, in which she attempted to shed light on the overwhelming lack of acceptance of science in the general public. In this speech, she joked about a wide range of issues, from the refusal to acknowledge human contribution to climate change, to the belief in horoscopes. As a science student watching what is unfolding in the White House, I am absolutely on the same page as Payette in terms of her disbelief at the lack of acceptance of many theories in science that are supported by overwhelming evidence. However, while I admire her passion for uniform understanding and acceptance of science, I do […]

Read more

Letter: China, E.U. will trump climate change

After Miami has been swallowed by the Atlantic, and the smog over the Great Plains becomes so thick farmers are reminded of great clouds of locusts, perhaps we can all look up and see a potential silver lining in U.S President Donald Trump’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Accord. As  America shies  away from global leadership on climate change, the European Union and China are stepping in to fill the void. The day after Trump announced on Twitter he would be leaving the Paris Accord, the E.U and China issued a joint statement ahead of their annual summit, held June 1−2 in Brussels. The document reaffirmed their collective commitment to the emissions reduction targets and underlying norms of the […]

Read more

Carleton prof receives $5.5 million in funding for climate change research

Catherine McKenna, minister of climate change and the environment, and Kristy Duncan, minister of science, announced on Oct. 19 the federal government’s commitment of $22 million towards climate change research at an event held at Carleton. Carleton professor Matthew Johnson and his team of researchers were one of the four recipients, and received $5.5 million in funding for research on flaring. Flaring is the burning of natural gas that cannot be processed, Johnson said, and its effects on the environment include black carbon emissions, and accelerated melting of snow. Duncan said the money will fund four networks across the country—projects focused on the environment, natural resources, advanced manufacturing, and energy. “[Johnson] and his team will work to better understand the impact of […]

Read more

Divestment debate places students against academics

While delegates in Paris last month began to hash out an agreement to reduce the impact of climate change, tens of thousands of people, many of whom were students, convened on Parliament Hill to demand strong commitment from the federal government on tackling climate change. In front of a large crowd on the steps of Parliament, a spokesperson from the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) called for the battle against climate change to be fought on post-secondary campuses through the fossil fuel divestment movement. “On more than 20 campuses across this country, students are actively lobbying to divest from the fossil fuel industry and invest in green economies,” said CFS national treasurer Anna Dubinski to a cheering crowd on Nov. […]

Read more

Thousands march for fight against climate change

Thousands of people dressed in green clothing and waving signs marched through downtown Ottawa on Nov. 29, demanding action on climate change on the eve of the United Nations climate change conference in Paris. Called the “100% Possible Climate March,” the goal of the event was to pressure the federal government to strike a deal with other countries and create a policy to reduce carbon emissions worldwide. Organizers are also calling for Canada to move toward 100 per cent renewable energy by 2050. The march began at Ottawa city hall and ended at Parliament Hill. Before starting, environmentalist David Suzuki gave a speech to the energetic crowd. Suzuki stressed the urgency of needing to address climate change and compared the […]

Read more
1 2 3