Letter: Help Greeks help everyone

I recently read an article written by Sean White addressing the recent motion brought forward by CUSA to initiate funding to Greek letter organizations. I am writing this op-ed as a Greek individual, I am not speaking on behalf of the Greek community. Sean poses a legitimate concern in his article. A non-Greek may ask themselves “why should some of my tuition be subsidized to organizations that aren’t open to all students?” When money is allocated to help CUSA establishments such as Rooster’s or Oliver’s, any student can reap the benefits. When money is given to inclusive clubs, anyone can become a member and experience the numerous outlets and societies Carleton has to offer. Since the first Greek organization, Phi […]

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A deeper look: Food service contracts at universities across Ontario

As Ryerson’s food contract with Aramark continues to be debated among students and faculty, the Charlatan takes a look at various food services offered at universities across the province.   Queen’s University Food services offered at Queen’s University were reportedly ranked second overall in Canada by the most recent Globe and Mail survey, according to Bruce Griffiths, the university’s director of housing and hospitality services at Queen’s University. Queen’s has a management fee contract with a company called Sodexo, meaning that all revenues go to the university. Sodexo bills Queen’s for all food, labour, and management fees, and the remaining money goes to Queen’s, so the university incurs no losses. “This gives us control over many critical decisions such as […]

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UBC pilots midterm prof evaluations

A group of University of British Columbia (UBC) teachers and students have tried and benefited from an initiative growing but seldom used at Carleton University— midterm course evaluations. The trial group of 22 UBC faculty took course and teaching style feedback from students at midterm last semester, and the benefits, said Simon Bates, a UBC physics prof who helped organize the initiative, were obvious. “[Students] get to offer feedback on how the course is going for them, at a time when there is still time to discuss and possibly address some of the various issues that may come up,” he said. By opening dialogue and reducing distance from students, he said the “mid-flight” feedback also benefits professors, in a way […]

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Opinion: Talking heads can’t replace the traditional classroom

This is a new low for this particular university and universities in general. Like many of you, I love being a part of Carleton and the community, but I cannot disregard this at all, nor can I wait until course evaluation at the end of March to voice my displeasure. I’m talking about Carleton using only video-on-demand (VOD) format to teach some of its courses. I’m not sure how many courses this affects, but I am personally involved in one. This course is pretty ridiculous to begin with. We learn how to do research using search engines and why we do this kind of research. We do not have personal interactions with the professors like traditional lectures. All of our […]

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Opinion: Funding Greek organizations will not make this A Better Carleton

On Feb. 25 Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) vice-president (finance) Michael De Luca moved a motion at council to strike an ad hoc committee to discuss the possibility of funding Greek organizations on campus with CUSA money. The committee was to consist of only the president, vice-president (internal), vice-president (finance), and vice-president (student life) of CUSA, the president of the Greek Council, and one representative from each of the 13 Greek organizations on campus. Although, Mr. De Luca rectified the makeup of the committee through an amendment at the council meeting, from the beginning it seemed to me as if decisions were already made and minds already made up. Mr. De Luca even admitted the motion was merely “symbolic.” But […]

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