Popping pills: Do study drugs actually affect academic performance?

Leaving things to the last minute requires solid concentration skills to get everything done, and popping pills or guzzling caffeine and energy drinks to finish that essay is a common narrative among students. Coffee, energy drinks, and drugs that treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), like Adderall, are what the scientific community call “stimulants”— substances that excite and speed up the brain to increase alertness, attention, and energy, according to Health Canada. But should students rely on stimulants to help them study, and do they actually impact academic performance? Why do students use study drugs? Charlotte Halliday, a third-year psychology student at Carleton University, said she uses caffeine and Adderall to help combat the anxiety of completing last-minute assignments and […]

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Cyclists who don’t wear helmets three times more likely to die from brain trauma, study finds

What parents have been saying for years is now official — cyclists who die of head injuries are much less likely to have been wearing a helmet, a study published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, released Oct. 15, has found. The study, which analyzed all accidental bicycle-related deaths in Ontario between 2006 and 2010, 129 incidents,  found that cyclists who didn’t wear a helmet were three times more likely to die from brain trauma than those who wore protective head gear. The study found that 77 per cent of the head-injury deaths among cyclists involved a collision with a motor vehicle. Cyclists who were killed ranged in ages from 10 to 83, and 86 per cent of those deaths […]

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