Maclean’s ranks universities by marijuana use

As the government is in the midst of legalizing marijuana, Maclean’s magazine has released a survey revealing how many students per university smoke cannabis in Canada. The self-reported study shows that students at Bishop’s University have the highest marijuana usage with 60 per cent of students reporting that they smoke. Maclean’s also categorized the survey by program of study which found that students in philosophy smoke the most. Fifty-seven per cent of philosophy students said they use cannabis occasionally to everyday. However, out of all the students that reported their use of marijuana, 63 per cent said they never smoke, while only two per cent revealed that they smoke daily. Carleton University ranked 11th out of 49 universities. Forty-three per […]

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Silver spoons: Exploring the issue of academic entitlement among post-secondary students

“Academic entitlement refers to . . . when students have the expectation that they deserve preferential treatment or awards and outcomes independent of their input and performance,” said Amy Peirone, a PhD student at the University of Windsor who wrote a study on the relationship between academic and workplace entitlement. The issue of whether students are “entitled” and “coddled” has been a recent debate among psychologists, educators, and students themselves. Steffie Hawrylak-Young, an instructor at Nova Scotia Community College, spoke out about the issue, saying she thinks students are becoming increasingly entitled. Hawrylak-Young said her students “asked for special favours without justification, like extensions on papers . . . because they are accustomed to handing in assignments late in high school.” […]

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Viewer discretion is advised: debates about trigger warnings in academia

The following program contains mature subject matter. Viewer discretion is advised. It’s a phrase we’ve seen and heard growing up, in movies and shows, warning us that questionable material may be ahead. However, a new kind of warning has extended to the world of academia—one that is given for much more serious reasons. The use of trigger warnings in classrooms is growing as campuses attempt to create more accepting spaces. Trigger warnings originated in the feminist blogosphere to caution graphic descriptions of sexual violence, and they have migrated to university campuses. Warnings are used to inform students of course material that has the potential to evoke strong emotional responses from students who have had traumatic experiences. As universities in the […]

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