Opinion: Educate frosh about sexual violence

I am certain that many individuals would praise the fact that Carleton frosh facilitators advertise sexual assault support services on their jerseys and would commend the fact that Diversity and Sexual Violence was the first topic to be discussed during the Fall Orientation leader training. The Consent Team implemented by student group Our Turn is also a good step forward. The truth of the matter, however, is that in comparison to the sexual violence ravaging universities across the country, these efforts are meagre in combatting this epidemic. Upon closer inspection, it becomes apparent how these bright initiatives and promising pursuits often do not yield much progress in advancing consent education and reducing sexual violence during frosh. For example, although we […]

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Letter: Smoke-free campuses will help end smoking addiction

Full disclosure, I am a smoker. I started before my 16th birthday about four years ago. Now, I hear that the University of Prince Edward Island (UPEI) is joining a few other schools in going smoke-free. That means no cigarettes, electronic cigarettes, water pipes, cigars, or tobacco anywhere on campus. As a smoker, I heard this and scoffed. But deep down, I think this is a good idea. Some students may say that smoking is their stress-relief. Even I say this. But it is not fact. More accurately, lighting up a cigarette has been shown to increase anxiety and tension. While students like myself might feel immediate release when the smoke hits their lips, they are not doing themselves any […]

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Editorial: Movies, T.V. should better reflect multiculturalism

Despite the ever-increasing multicultural nature of our world, it is yet to be accurately reflected in the media we consume. Hollywood and various content creators have come under scrutiny in recent years for lacking representation and for white-washing pieces that belong to other cultures. While adaptations of movies and shows facilitate the exchange of cultures and culture sharing, it’s important not to lose the nuances of the culture in the process. Recently, Netflix’s adaptation of the Japanese manga Death Note came under fire for white-washing and failing to have a cast that accurately represents the original characters. Similarly, a live-action remake of Aladdin was also criticized when actress Naomi Scott was officially cast as Princess Jasmine, as she did not […]

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Letter: Removing monuments oversimplifies history

For some, John A. Macdonald, one of our country’s founders, and Egerton Ryerson, a pioneer of public education in Ontario, no longer have a place in Canadian history, aside from being remembered as villains responsible for residential schools. Not only is this view overly simplistic, but unfair to those who contributed so much to our country. We celebrate historical figures for their accomplishments in the making of Canada as we know it. While it would be wrong to blindly worship them in light of their grave policy mistakes, we cannot simply reject their importance by measuring their views and practices by today’s standards and values regarding our current understanding of human rights. Residential schools are one of the darkest parts […]

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Opinion: First-generation students can succeed

I was always a good student, but also struggled. Cloaked under good grades that assured my distant parents that all was well were feelings of alienation, helplessness and even shame. My first year was the hardest. In high school, I spoke up in class, but in a university lecture hall or discussion group, I was mum. I soon fell into common routines–residence, class, cafeteria. University’s supposed to be about broadening your horizons, right? It often felt like an overwhelming power was pressed on me. It was the institution and the privilege it symbolized. It was the school’s unfamiliarity. It was other students who did worse in school but seemed to belong here more than I did. It was felt in […]

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