EDITORIAL: Carleton should avoid CUPE 4600 strike

After months, negotiations between the Canadian Union for Public Employees (CUPE) Local 4600 and the university have a familiar threat hanging over them—that of a strike.    CUPE 4600, which represents teaching assistants and contract instructors at Carleton, recently requested a no board report. This means that if no agreement is reached between both sides within 17 days, a strike is likely to occur in early March. A strike would have a severe impact on students. Assignments wouldn’t be marked, and classes taught by contract instructors —which are most of them—wouldn’t take place. This would potentially delay graduations, and impact final projects and theses. OC Transpo buses would also no longer drop students off on campus in a show of […]

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EDITORIAL: Term limits needed in CUSA

In the recent elections for both the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) and the Rideau River Residence Association (RRRA) current executives have run for a new position on the executive or as incumbents. Zameer Masjedee and Alexandra Noguera, both current CUSA executives, were re-elected to the 2017/18 executive, and Hyder Naqvi, current RRRA president, is running for re-election. While neither organization has term limits in their constitutions, there should be a one-year limit on executive members. The values and ideas students care about, and the population of students who make up the membership of the student body, are always changing—for this reason, so should the executives. When student association executives—also students—run for re-election, they stop new ideas from coming into […]

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Editorial: Electoral offense rulings need to be more transparent

In the recent Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) election, the elections office gave out a number of violations for some electoral offenses—but not for other ones. The role of the elections office in the CUSA elections is to be a bridge between students and the electoral process. The office should make the process accessible and transparent to both candidates and the voting population to ensure impartiality. This year however, the office was not transparent in the way it conducted its business. The violations process was obscure and unclear. When asked by The Charlatan for further clarifications on some electoral violations, the CUSA elections office simply declined to comment on the record time and time again. Students are then left with […]

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Editorial: Students need more information on CFS

Members of the University of Toronto Students’ Union (UTSU) have recently made actions to leave the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS). The newly-elected Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) executive has promised to do the same. Both schools will need to hold a referendum if they want to leave the CFS. At Carleton CUSA needs to ensure students are aware of the what the CFS is, as well as the benefits and drawbacks of the federation, if students are to make a fair and informed decision in such a referendum. This is currently a problem, as the 2012-13 CUSA executive removed all CFS material from CUSA service centres, meaning the majority of students might not even be familiar with the various […]

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Editorial: Students should vote for a mixed executive

In the middle of a Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) election, it can be easy and tempting to get caught up in the hype and glitz of a particular slate. The well-crafted messages and eye-catching posters might entice students to vote for that slate in all positions on the CUSA executive. However, students could be better served by a mixed executive—one that isn’t dominated by a single slate. A mixed slate would make CUSA more representative of the undergraduate student body. With diversity, we get different ideas on council, and ones that blanket a variety of issues. A mixed slate will draw on ideas from everyone running, not just one group. This year’s executive benefitted from the inclusion of Ashley […]

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