‘Self-compassion’ helps students deal with stress: Study

A new study from the University of British Columbia (UBC) found that self-compassion in first-year students helps reduce stress and improve motivation. The study took place over a five-month timespan and surveyed 189 first-year UBC students, analyzing if an increase in self-empathy would prompt a change in mental and physiological fulfillment. The study defines self-compassion as “self-kindness,” which involves not being “overly critical of oneself . . . recognizing failure is universal . . . and mindfulness, which means being present and calm in the moment.” UBC kinesiology professor Peter Crocker, the study’s co-author, previously found that female athletes who reported elevated amounts of self-compassion felt lower levels of self-criticism and negative thoughts, according to a release from the school. […]

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OUSA submits provincial budget recommendations

The Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance (OUSA) recently released a report of recommendations for the 2017 provincial budget. OUSA’s recommendations focus on four issues raised by students in the process of creating the report: easier access to post-secondary statistics and information, supporting student services, preventing sexual violence, and advancing work-integrated learning. The report suggests how to address these issues and gives an overall estimation of the cost of implementing them into policy. The recommendations aim to show the ways the budget can use existing resources more efficiently, according to an OUSA press release. The report recommends $12 million be allocated from the discontinued Mental Health Innovation Fund, and instead put towards improving front-line mental health care on campuses. OUSA also calls for […]

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Sugar baby service comes with potential risks for students

Disclaimer: This article contains details about an alleged sexual assault.  Rising tuition costs are causing more Canadian university students to become “sugar babies” to pay off student debt, according to Seeking Arrangement, a service that allows “sugar daddies” to pay for “mutually beneficial” relationships with a sugar baby. But these finance-assisting and gift-giving relationships can come with a risk. A Carleton University student, who wished to remain anonymous, said they used Seeking Arrangement as a sugar baby. The student said the money they received from the service went towards tuition, rent, and food. The student, however, disclosed having been assaulted by a sugar daddy through the service.  For their first meeting, they spent some time driving around town. But the student said things “got a little […]

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New off-campus residence to target Carleton students

The Ottawa planning committee recently approved the construction of a new, 12-storey private apartment building near Carleton University. The building will be located at 774 Bronson Ave., south of Carling Avenue. The developer, Textbook Suites, said the building will include 172 bachelor, one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments. The unit will be designed specifically for university students, according to city documents. It’s expected to have 38 parking spaces in total—17 residential, and 21 for visitors. “[This new apartment building] would be open to all students,” said Fraser Smith, vice-president of development for Textbook Suites. “However, given the close proximity to [Carleton] we would expect the majority to be Carleton students, as would be our 256 Rideau project for University of Ottawa […]

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Declining college enrolment could lead to more costly tuition

Changes to Ontario’s student loan program can’t come soon enough for the province’s colleges. Falling enrolment at post-secondary institutions has been particularly disastrous for colleges. Without action, it could potentially send schools into nearly $2 billion of debt in eight years, according to a recent report from PricewaterhouseCoopers, an advisory firm. “The government has been only funding colleges for enrolment growth,” said Linda Franklin, president and CEO of Colleges Ontario. “What that means is if your school’s enrolment goes down two per cent, you get less money from the government.” Franklin said an aging population likely means that enrolment will keep falling. “We’ve just hit a period in time where the echo boom has just gone through post-secondary [education],” Franklin […]

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