Politics blog: Populism will hurt the UK, not the EU

Last week, British Prime Minister Theresa May triggered Article 50, thus beginning an arduous two-year process to exit the European Union (EU). Pundits have suggested that the United Kingdom’s (UK) monumental invocation of Article 50 would stir up populist support within other European countries. By examining the political climate of EU member states with upcoming elections, and by highlighting the fractured nature of domestic politics in the UK, it is clear that Europeanism is not under threat from populism; rather, the UK is. Many EU member states have either resisted the rise of populism, or are in the midst of fighting it. In the recent Dutch election, the far-right populist PVV party was expected to dominate the political landscape of […]

Read more

Politics blog: Anti-Islamophobia motion divides the country even more

M-103, a motion asking members of the House of Commons to condemn “islamophobia” and “all forms of systemic racism and religious discrimination” was passed on March 23, with 201 MPs voting in favour of the motion and 91 voting against. But what has the anti-islamophobia motion actually done for Canadians? Since it is a motion, it hasn’t really done anything concrete. Motions aren’t bills; I’ve seen a lot of remarks from people who think Islamophobia is now illegal. This is not the case. However, the message the motion sent out to Canadians was that we shouldn’t be Islamophobic. The motion is well-intended as no one deserves to be subject to discrimination. But I believe working with “antis” instead of trying […]

Read more

Politics blog: A case for Scottish independence

Nicola Sturgeon, First Minister and leader of the Scottish National Party (SNP) has declared her intention to seek a new referendum on Scottish Independence from the UK. Her argument is based on a clause in the Edinburgh agreement stating that the government of Scotland could seek a redress if the circumstances surrounding the referendum significantly changed. Since then, Brexit has endangered the economic future of the UK, as well as threatened the local sovereignty of governments in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. The core of the issue is the centralization of authority. There is little to no transparency on the exit process from the European Union, and Theresa May has been keen to exclude any outside voices from her own […]

Read more

Politics blog: A breakdown of the Conservative leadership race

The Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) is in the midst of a leadership race, and it is unclear what the future of the party will be. A relatively new party to the right of the political spectrum has to come together to form a strong opposition to the Liberals. To do so, they need a leader who can hold the party together the way former Prime Minister Stephen Harper did. Among the 14 candidates in the leadership race, we see how conservatives differ on a large number of issues, united mainly by fiscal policy. In the past, the division was clear: there are progressive conservatives, and there are social conservatives. However, in the era of Brexit and Donald Trump, I […]

Read more

Politics blog: Playing victim isn’t feminist

In light of International Women’s Day last week, I have a few thoughts: I think too often I’m afraid to call myself a feminist, not because I’m fearful of the reputation I might get when I defend the rights of women and encourage feminine liberation, but because the word is now being associated with something that I do not consider feminism. Think of Lena Dunham, and her show Girls: four white women living in New York City off of the privilege and wealth their parents earned, and walking through life with the word “victim” written on their foreheads. Think of Taylor Swift, who’s built her career off of being “America’s Sweetheart,” a victim of bullying by an “angry black man,” […]

Read more
1 2 3