Book Blog: Asian Heritage Month Author Spotlight

May is Asian Heritage Month in Canada and Asian American and Pacific Islander Month in the U.S. In celebration, here are five books by Asian-Canadian and Asian American authors to read in a variety of different genres. 1. Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien Do Not Say We Have Nothing was one of my favourite books last year and it well deserves all the praise it has gotten, including winning the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General Award, and being long-listed for the Man Booker Prize. This is a beautiful, epic family saga that chronicles love and loss. The book follows a young woman named Marie trying to piece together her family’s past during the Chinese cultural revolution. […]

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Review: Bon Cop Bad Cop 2

Bon Cop, Bad Cop 2, helmed by new director Alain Desrochers and penned solely by returning writer Patrick Huard, makes for a memorable return to the bilingual Canadian action flick. The first film saw Anglophone O.P.P. officer Martin Ward (Colm Feore) and Francophone detective David Bouchard (Huard) working together on a murder case that encompassed both jurisdictions, with the dialogue split fairly equally between both official languages with the use of subtitles. This time around, instead of playing off the Ontario-Quebec border for most of its humour, the film turns instead to the Canada-U.S. border, making fun of Americans and their relationship to their closest ally while still remaining a fluently bilingual film. It’s been over 10 years since Bon […]

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CUAG’s Open Space Lab allows for performance-based art

The Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) hosted a performance by Hong Kong Exile and fu-GEN Theatre, along with Theatre Conspiracy. The performance art piece, titled “No Foreigners,” explores Chinese shopping malls as “racialized spaces of cultural creation and clash,” according to the CUAG website. The performance is the second one to use the gallery’s “Open Space Lab” format, which allows artists to use the gallery space as part of their work. The open nature of the lab allows artists to interact with others and discuss ideas related to their art with the public and other artists. “We came up with the idea of using the space of the gallery between exhibitions as a research development space,” said Anna Khimasia, who […]

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Commentary: Hollerado performs at Bronson Centre

Ottawa rock band Hollerado delivered a lively and upbeat performance during their homecoming concert at Ottawa’s Bronson Centre on May 12. After months of touring around the world, the band brought their “Born Yesterday” tour to their hometown in front of a packed and energetic crowd. Proud of his Ottawa roots, lead singer Menno Versteeg told The Charlatan, “It’s always nice playing where you grew up, you make family and friends proud, and I’m surrounded by Sens fans.” Versteeg also talked about what it was like serving as the opening act on Sum 41 and the Sam Roberts Band’s recent tours. “You learn a lot from bands like that who have been doing it for so long and are real […]

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Satirical art thriving under U.S. administration

When Michael de Adder received news of U.S. President Donald Trump’s election, he said he felt shock and anger, and decided to pick up his pens and draw a picture of Trump kissing a reluctant Lady Liberty. A Halifax-based, award-winning editorial cartoonist, de Adder is one cartoonist among many who has found plenty to draw about during this new American presidential term. “If everything was hunky-dory in the world, cartoonists would have a hard go of it,” de Adder said. “But politics, being what it is, always leads to situations that are ripe for lampooning. And right now, the situation couldn’t be better for cartoonists.” For de Adder, what motivates him to draw political cartoons is anger. He said his […]

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