Letter: Religious rights shouldn’t override women’s rights

RE: March for Life is about preserving humanity, June 28-July 26 The nonsensical notion that life begins at conception is a religious conceit. If your faith is such that you believe that a child exists from the moment of conception then it’s your right to make your own decisions about your health and physical autonomy based on that. But, as with so many things that are part of personal faith, when people seek to impose those beliefs on others, it ceases to become a matter of faith and then becomes an issue of systemic and cultural oppression. The freedom of religion identified in the Fundamental Freedoms section of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms applies to protect the freedom […]

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Book Blog: Asian Heritage Month Author Spotlight

May is Asian Heritage Month in Canada and Asian American and Pacific Islander Month in the U.S. In celebration, here are five books by Asian-Canadian and Asian American authors to read in a variety of different genres. 1. Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien Do Not Say We Have Nothing was one of my favourite books last year and it well deserves all the praise it has gotten, including winning the Scotiabank Giller Prize, the Governor General Award, and being long-listed for the Man Booker Prize. This is a beautiful, epic family saga that chronicles love and loss. The book follows a young woman named Marie trying to piece together her family’s past during the Chinese cultural revolution. […]

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Review: In/Words Anonymous

Poetry is always a complex thing to review, often being harder to judge than other forms of writing. With novels and short stories, the reader can judge them based on how well they fit genre conventions, or whether they brilliantly subverted tropes. But what makes a good poem is far more personal than that, especially due to the rapid growth in the genre over the last century. The fact that poetry is so personal is something that’s always appealed to me, but does make it rather hard to review sometimes. In/Words latest issue is completely anonymous, adding another layer of poetic complexity to the writing and reader’s experience. Normally when I sit down with a collection of poetry, it’s either […]

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Review: In/Words Anonymous

Poetry is always a complex thing to review, often being harder to judge than other forms of writing. With novels and short stories, the reader can judge them based on how well they fit genre conventions, or whether they brilliantly subverted tropes. But what makes a good poem is far more personal than that, especially due to the rapid growth in the genre over the last century. The fact that poetry is so personal is something that’s always appealed to me, but it does make it rather hard to review sometimes. In/Words latest issue is completely anonymous, adding another layer of poetic complexity to the writing and reader’s experience. Normally when I sit down with a collection of poetry, it’s either a recent publication or a […]

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Book Blog: Webcomics—all the creativity, none of the expenses

Comics are a fantastic type of media, melding beautiful art, compelling stories and characters together. However, if you’re not that familiar with the genre, it can be intimidating to shell out a lot of money for multiple volumes or issues. That’s where webcomics come in. Over the past two decades, the internet has allowed cartoonists, artists, and writers to experiment and create their own stories rather than waiting to be discovered by a big publisher. There’s amazing stories being told in webcomics, both new and longstanding. Here’s some of my favourite webcomic reads that explore speculative fiction, from steampunk to superheroes, from robots to fairytale retellings. Girl Genius by Phil and Kaja Foglio Europa was in chaos after “sparks”, mad […]

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