Students call for better election advertising

Many students are blaming the lack of candidates in the 2018 Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) election on a failure to sufficiently advertise the election. Chief electoral officer (CEO), Nada Ibrahim, said it’s CUSA’s job to advertise elections. Because the members of the Elections Office weren’t hired until January this year, she said it wasn’t possible to advertise the elections far in advance. She also said her previous years working at the Elections Office began in November, which made it easier to advertise elections. CUSA president Zameer Masjedee said the elections were advertised through posters around campus, a Facebook page, and Facebook advertisements. He said advertising is “primarily” the job of the Elections Office. “It is [the Elections Office’s] job—you […]

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CUSA elections see decrease in candidates

The Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) elections saw a significant decrease in candidates for the 2018 elections. A total of eight candidates—two independents and six from the One Carleton slate—were in the running on the first day of voting (Feb. 7), leaving four positions uncontested. Only the vice-president (student issues) and vice-president (student life) positions held two candidates as the independent candidate for vice-president (finance) dropped out of the race on Feb. 5. CUSA president Zameer Masjedee said he thinks the lack of candidates is partly due to the voter gap between the One Carleton slate and the Change slate in the 2017 elections. A previous article from the Charlatan reported that 3,957 students voted for Masjedee, the One Carleton […]

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VP finance candidate drops out of CUSA election

The Elections Office has confirmed that independent candidate Oluwatobi Oriola dropped out of the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) elections on Feb. 6. Oriola said he dropped out of the elections due to illness and being busy with school. Oriola was running for a position as vice-president (finance). The only other candidate, Luke Taylor, is running under the One Carleton slate. The position is now running uncontested. With Oriola exiting the race, of the six executive positions up for grabs, there are now four positions that are uncontested.

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Campaign launched urging students to vote ‘no confidence’ in CUSA election

James Brunet, a fourth-year computer science student at Carleton University, has started a campaign to encourage undergraduates to vote ‘no confidence’ in the 2018 Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) elections. He said the lack of candidates running in the elections is undemocratic.  Currently, four of the six executive positions are running uncontested, including president, vice-president (internal), vice-president (student services), and vice-president (finance). Vice-president (student life), and vice-president (student issues) each have two candidates running—either an independent or a candidate from the One Carleton slate. Brunet is also the former campaign manager for the independent candidate running for the position of vice-president (student issues). He said he blames CUSA for failing to advertise the election far enough in advance. He said there […]

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CUSA ranked voting system up in the air

With the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) election just days away, the elections office has yet to determine whether ranked voting will be implemented for the election process this season. At a council meeting on Jan. 23, CUSA voted unanimously to drop the writ of election, including the implementation of ranked voting for all the executive positions. Meanwhile, councillor positions will still have first-past-the-post ballots—where the candidate with the most number of votes is elected. In contrast, a ranked voting ballot allows voters to list candidates in order of preference. Then in each round of analysis, the candidate with the least number of votes is eliminated and those who voted for that candidate have their vote redistributed to the candidate […]

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