Creative Writing Blog: What not to do at parties

“What the hell happened to you?!” “Uh,” I said, stepping into the house and scratching the back of my neck. “I don’t really know. It was a weird night. Can I shower first and get some not-torn clothes on? For some reason I’ve got ketchup all over me.” “That doesn’t look like ketchup,” my roommate said, closing the door as I walked into our small apartment. He swiped at a red patch on my torso with his finger and lifted it to his nose. “It smells coppery.” I scoffed. “What are you saying? That it’s blood? It’s probably that metallic paint that uses copper to make it shiny, then. Some art kids brought a bunch to the party. They were […]

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Letter: The annual March for Life is a misnomer

The “pro-life” March for Life happens every year, and every year it’s met with resistance. This year, I attended the counter-protest, and it was eye-opening (and only affirmed my pro-choice leanings). One of the first thoughts I had approaching Parliament Hill was the number of high school students carrying pro-life banners. I then learned that Catholic schools across the province brought these children up, marketing it as a “school trip” to Ottawa. Apart from the few older people who cared about the pro-life cause, this is what most of the march’s crowd consisted of – teenagers who wanted to visit Ottawa, not a huge crowd of people passionately marching for life. Another point there–despite being called the “March for Life,” […]

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OPINION: Campus printing services need work

Every time I have to swipe my card to print out yet another sheet of paper, a rush of fear runs through me. What if I don’t have enough print credits? I have the usual five or six sheets to print for my writer’s circle every week, and maybe another eight when I have assignments—but those 10 cents add up, and yet again I find my card empty.  And if it’s not my card that won’t work, it’s the printer in the University Centre—and then I have to run to the nearest building, only to find the printer there is broken too. Despite being students in a digital age, most professors still request hard copies for assignments. Papers only get […]

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Letter: Women’s-only gym hour campaign was a success

Last semester’s campaign to have a women’s-only gym hour at Carleton received a lot of backlash. The campaign surveyed students on campus, and used the responses to come up with propositions for Athletics. While the implementation of a women’s-only gym hour in the Carleton gym is not one of the end results, the final suggestions mark progress nonetheless. These proposals move beyond the original request, tackling the underlying problems in women’s health, fitness, and sport at Carleton. If these propositions are seriously considered and implemented, the campaign will have achieved far more than it set out to do—and this would be a victory for feminism on campus. The first proposal tackles the main opposition that many students had with the […]

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Letter: Carleton needs to better accomodate students with restricted diets

Living in residence at Carleton in your first year means you automatically have to have a meal plan with the residence cafeteria. All-you-can-eat buffets every day for a year seems great for the first few months, but as students enter the winter term, complaints about the cafeteria food grow. These complaints are mostly about the monotony of the food. But if a student with no dietary restrictions is dissatisfied with the food, how do those students feel who do have limitations—either due to allergies, religion or a vegetarian/vegan lifestyle—on what they can eat? For the most part, the cafeteria does a pretty good job of making sure students with diets for religious reasons are well accommodated. The grill does make […]

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