Mixed reactions by CFS for new federal budget

The federal government is bringing welcome change for Indigenous, part-time and adult students but lacks bold vision for post-secondary education, the Canadian Federation of Students (CFS) said, in reaction to the 2017 budget. Among the budget changes the CFS supports is the investment of $90 million into the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP) for Indigenous students, and expanding eligibility for the federal grants for part-time students and adult learners with dependent children. “It falls short of what exactly we wanted but we are seeing incremental changes that are proving politicians have to talk about what our priorities are,” said Bilan Arte, CFS’ national chairperson. Funding for the PSSSP was capped in the 1990s despite growth in the number of Indigenous […]

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Funding boost for youth jobs and Indigenous students detailed in budget

The federal Liberal government will boost funding for youth jobs, and add grants for part-time, adult and Indigenous students. But it fell short of meeting several promises from the 2015 federal election. Unlike last year, when the federal government raised the maximum Canada Student Grant for low-income students to $3,000, there was no additional spending pledges or actions regarding low- or middle-income students. The Liberals also left the threshold that any graduate will not have to repay the federal portion of their student loans until they are earning an annual income of at least $25,000 untouched. The budget for the 2017-18 year was announced by Finance Minister Bill Morneau on March 22. Part-time students eligible for more grants The federal government […]

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Opinion: CUSA dynasty triumphs again

It shouldn’t objectively shock anyone that the rebranded One Carleton slate swept the Carleton University Students’ Association (CUSA) executive elections by large vote totals. Regardless of whether its supporters sport purple or forest green t-shirts, the A Better Carleton/Your Carleton/One Carleton dynasty has, time and again, successfully secured the necessary bloc of voters to eke out narrow victories in past years, and landslides in this year’s case. In this election, it was the same strategy: secure the support of their regular base of voters—which is often done through ensuring close relationships with certain campus groups, and to have a visible campaign so these voters remember you and cast their ballot. That’s done by handing out leaflets and talking to people […]

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Politics blog: Trudeau is on a collision course with Trump – and his own brand

It’s understandable and respectable that Canadian prime ministers have historically stayed mum when they disagree with the policies and beliefs of their American counterparts. Standing for principle’s sake instead of finding points of agreement can lead to chilly relations, resulting in unwanted consequences on policies that affect the lives of everyday people. Add into the equation the elephant-mouse relationship that Canada has with its southern neighbour, and the fallout may be more adverse for us. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has so far embodied such a cautious position, based on the belief that the boat of good relations should not be unnecessarily rocked by incendiary words or sharp rebuttals towards the president. Such a strategy has almost always worked on the […]

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